Weekly and Monthly Newsletter

Updates to The Thinking Woman’s Guide to Breast Cancer

Here you’ll find useful information that complements the book.

Diagnosis

New Breast Cancer Screening Imaging Method Finds Tumors in Seconds

New Breast Cancer Screening Imaging Method Finds Tumors in Seconds

Researchers said they developed a quicker, better and cheaper way than mammograms to detect breast cancer: A laser scanner that can find tumors in as little as 15 seconds. The near-infrared lasers shine pulses of light into the breast tissue, which, researchers report in a study published Friday in the journal Nature Communications, is more effective than traditional mammograms.

Technique may improve detection of breast tumors 

Technique may improve detection of breast tumors 

Researchers have been developing a new method for detecting breast cancer called photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT). The technique uses harmless pulses of laser light to penetrate the breast tissue. This causes a type of sound wave called photoacoustic waves to spread through the tissue. These waves can be measured by sensors surrounding the breast. Blood vessels react to the light differently, providing contrast that allows PACT to form clear images of the breast’s blood vessel network. This approach can be used to spot tumors because tumor growth depends on blood vessels.

Surgery

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Chemotherapy

What is Genomic Testing? 

What is Genomic Testing? 

Genetics can help to tell you your risk for getting cancer, while genomics can help once you have cancer to choose your course of care.

Radiation

Investigating the Cardiac Side Effects of Cancer Treatments 

Investigating the Cardiac Side Effects of Cancer Treatments 

Over the past decade, breast cancer has been a focus of research on cardiac side effects, in part because certain treatments for the disease are known to cause these side effects.Based on this evidence, the American Heart Association recently issued a rare scientific...

Using Oxygen “Microbubbles” to Improve Radiation Therapy

Using Oxygen “Microbubbles” to Improve Radiation Therapy

Oxygen-carrying “microbubbles” could potentially improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy in the treatment of breast cancer, findings from a study in mice suggest. Using the bubbles along with radiation slowed tumor growth more than radiation alone, as this NCI Cancer Currents post reports.

Proton Therapy For Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Why Choose This Treatment? 

Proton Therapy For Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Why Choose This Treatment? 

Treatments for breast cancer include chemotherapy, hormone therapy, targeted therapy, surgery, and radiation. As there is not one perfect formula to eliminate the disease, many patients will need to undergo a combination of these treatment methods. In some of these cases, however, certain treatments pose higher risks. For women with left-sided breast cancer, it is important to consider what type of radiation is best. Since the tumor is close to the heart, certain treatments can cause significant damage to this vital organ, while other treatments may spare damage to this vital organ. In these cases, proton therapy is often a better option.

Lifestyle Issues

New Study: Eating Organic Foods Reduces Your Risk Of Getting Cancer

New Study: Eating Organic Foods Reduces Your Risk Of Getting Cancer

According to a groundbreaking study published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, an American Medical Association journal, eating organic foods that are free from pesticides is strongly correlated with a dramatic reduction in the risk of cancer. For the study, a team...

Other New Research

Humans Are the Unwitting Test Subjects in a Worldwide Experiment on Microplastics

Humans Are the Unwitting Test Subjects in a Worldwide Experiment on Microplastics

Much of the hundreds of millions of tons of plastic waste in our oceans is made up of microplastics. These are defined as plastic beads, fibers or fragments with a diameter of less than five thousand micrometers (μm), equal to one-half centimeter. Nanoplastics are thousands of times tinier, with a diameter of less than 0.1 μm, and are also likely to be widely present. By comparison, a human hair ranges from about 15 to 180 μm across. Some of these microplastics are deliberately engineered like microbeads in a facial scrub. Others result from the break down of larger plastic items.

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