Breast Cancer News

The newsletter provides a selection of recent articles in the media related to breast cancer. Subscribe on the right to have the weekly roundup emailed to you.

Tissue adjacent to tumors may not be “normal,” study finds

Tissue adjacent to tumors may not be “normal,” study finds

Researchers have known that cancer cells interact extensively “with the surrounding microenvironment of the tumor,” added Dinah Singer, Ph.D., director of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology. “What’s novel here is the suggestion that the interactions extend beyond that to tissue that appears to be pathologically normal.”

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Fracking Chemicals Cause Changes to Mammary Tissue 

Fracking Chemicals Cause Changes to Mammary Tissue 

At levels found in drinking water within a mile of fracking operations, the chemicals used to extract oil and gas disrupt the endocrine systems of mice. Mice were exposed in utero, developing precancerous lesions in breast tissue, decreased sperm counts, and multiple organ impacts after puberty. Meanwhile, in areas of severe drought, some conventional farmers are using “treated” water left over from drilling operations to water their crops.

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Are New Cancer Drugs Worth Their Price? 

Are New Cancer Drugs Worth Their Price? 

A new analysis in the BMJ evaluated 48 cancer drugs that the European equivalent of the FDA, the European Medicines Agency, approved before 2009 and 2013 (Davis et al, BMJ, Oct. 4, 2017). The EMA had approved the drugs for 68 different uses, eight on the basis of a single study each. Several studies were not double-blind, considered a standard for drug research. Although it seemed that the medications were extending survival, later research showed that was true only for half of them. In addition, that benefit was judged clinically meaningful only in about half of those cases. The authors concluded that many of these cancer drugs were approved “without evidence of benefit on survival or quality of life.” Even more than three years after approval there remains a paucity of solid scientific evidence of substantial benefit.

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Breast Cancer Survivor Story Hard Life After Treatment

Breast Cancer Survivor Story Hard Life After Treatment

Complaining is always awkward, but complaining about cancer gets you more side-eye than a priest at a pro-choice rally. People prefer to hear about drama they can help with, like decoding texts from a toxic ex. Scary diseases should be avoided in polite conversation, because, well, we’d all like to avoid them, but this goes doubly if you’re a cancer survivor: You’ve survived, after all.

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Share the Love on Valentine’s Day, Not GMOs

Share the Love on Valentine’s Day, Not GMOs

Most of America’s favorite Valentine’s Day sweets are chockfull of ingredients that are highly likely to be genetically engineered– such as sugar, soy lecithin, corn starch, and corn syrup and partially hydrogenated soybean oil. GMOs have never been proven safe for consumption. GMOs are designed to work hand-in-hand with pesticides, and a growing body of studies expose the health effects of exposure to and consumption of these toxic chemicals.

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Axillary lymph nodes and breast cancer: All you need to know

Axillary lymph nodes and breast cancer: All you need to know

The staging of a person’s cancer is a part of the TNM system, which stands for Tumor, Nodes, and Metastasis. Some doctors use the TNM system to help them provide a prognosis or an outlook for how likely they are to be able to treat a person’s breast cancer successfully.

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Cribriform breast cancer: Grading and types

Cribriform breast cancer: Grading and types

Cribriform breast cancer is a rare form of breast cancer that is often combined with another form of breast cancer. It is typically a low-grade and slow-growing cancer with a better outlook than most other types of invasive breast cancer.

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Calif. Governor Signs Cleaning Product Disclosure Law 

Calif. Governor Signs Cleaning Product Disclosure Law 

The Cleaning Product Right to Know Act of 2017 – Senate Bill 258, authored by Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens – requires the ingredients in cleaning products to be listed on both product labels and online. This applies particularly to chemicals whose ability to harm human health or the environment has been recognized by established scientific authoritative bodies. Under this law, the mandatory disclosure also applies to ingredients in fragrance mixtures, which have been tightly held secrets until now.

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Why These Women Said ‘No’ to Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

Why These Women Said ‘No’ to Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

“Reconstruction is a voluntary and deeply personal choice,” says Melissa L. Pilewskie, MD, a surgical breast oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. While some women will undergo the surgery, others want a more minimal approach, she says. “They just want to get through treatment and not add anything else, or it’s simply not important to them.”

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Penn tattoo artist creates 3D nipples, closure for survivors

Penn tattoo artist creates 3D nipples, closure for survivors

Sarcich’s 3D tattoos use a trompe l’oeil effect to make it appear there’s a nipple there. A second-generation tattoo artist, she uses micropigmentation, or a permanent tattoo, to make that 3-D nipple look almost identical to a woman’s remaining nipple or the ones she had prior to surgery.

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New Method That Targets Breast Cancer Metastasis in Bones Developed

New Method That Targets Breast Cancer Metastasis in Bones Developed

A new method using small particles loaded with chemotherapy drugs is a viable approach to target breast cancer cells that have spread to the bones, according to a report that appeared in the journal Cancer Research. The strategy, developed by a research team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, combines a nanoparticle-based drug delivery method with a surface molecule called integrin β3. The integrin enables the small particles to get inside the bones and deliver the chemotherapy drug directly to the cancer cells.

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Weight loss surgery reduces cancer risk by 33 percent in women

Weight loss surgery reduces cancer risk by 33 percent in women

“We found,” says lead researcher Dr. Daniel Schauer, “[that] having bariatric surgery is associated with a reduced risk of cancer, especially obesity-associate[d] cancers including postmenopausal breast cancer, endometrial cancer, pancreatic cancer, and colon cancer. What’s surprising is how great the risk of cancer was reduced.”

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New compound kills cancer without harming healthy cells

New compound kills cancer without harming healthy cells

“We’re hopeful that the targeted compounds we’re developing will prove more effective than current anti-cancer therapies by directly causing cancer cells to self-destruct,” explains senior author Evripidis Gavathiotis, an associate professor of biochemistry and of medicine.

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Breast cancer: Bacterial deficiency linked with onset

Breast cancer: Bacterial deficiency linked with onset

“In our wildest dreams,” says Dr. Eng, “we hope we can use microbiomics right before breast cancer forms and then prevent cancer with probiotics or antibiotics.” “If we can target specific pro-cancer bacteria,” adds Dr. Grobmyer, “we may be able to make the environment less hospitable to cancer and enhance existing treatments.”

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EWG Explains: How to choose the best water filters – YouTube

EWG Explains: How to choose the best water filters – YouTube

Water filters are necessary to remove or reduce the myriad chemicals that contaminate our nation’s drinking water, some of which are linked to cancer and endocrine disruption. For more tips on selecting the best filter for your home, visit EWG’s Healthy Living: Home Guide

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Do Airport Scanners Alter Our DNA?

Do Airport Scanners Alter Our DNA?

The TSA (Transportation Safety Administration) insists that the new technology “uses non-ionizing radio-frequency energy in the millimeter spectrum with no known adverse health effects.” According to at least one group of researchers, that’s not the case. At the Center for Nonlinear Studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, a group of scientists reported that terahertz waves have an ability to “unzip double-stranded DNA, creating bubbles that could significantly interfere with processes such as gene expression and DNA replication.”

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5 Good Reasons to Exercise If You’re Battling Breast Cancer or Worried About Getting It

5 Good Reasons to Exercise If You’re Battling Breast Cancer or Worried About Getting It

Research suggests that there’s an inverse relationship between cancer and exercise: As physical activity levels increase, the incidence of breast cancer decreases. That was the finding of a review of 73 studies published online in 2011 in the journal Recent Results in Cancer Research. Overall, the study found that the risk of breast cancer was 25 percent lower in women who were the most physically active compared with women who were least active.

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EWG’s Dirty Dozen Guide to Food Additives

EWG’s Dirty Dozen Guide to Food Additives

EWG’s “Dirty Dozen Guide to Food Additives” helps you figure it all out by highlighting some of the worst failures of the regulatory system. The guide covers ingredients associated with serious health concerns, additives banned or restricted in other countries and other substances that shouldn’t be in food. And it underscores the need for better government oversight of our food system.

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Breast Cancer Helpline

Breast Cancer Helpline

The Breast Cancer Helpline connects you to a trained volunteer who has been diagnosed with breast cancer for emotional support, guidance and hope. Whether you are recently diagnosed, in treatment, years beyond treatment, living with metastatic breast cancer, or a loved one – you are not alone, we’re here to help.

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It’s Official: California Issues Caution on Cell Phone Use

It’s Official: California Issues Caution on Cell Phone Use

This week, California officially issued groundbreaking guidelines advising cell phone users to keep phones away from their bodies and limit use when reception is weak. State officials caution that studies link radiation from long-term cell phone use to an increased risk of brain cancer, lower sperm counts and other health problems, and note that children’s developing brains could be at greater risk.

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Increased Physical Activity in Breast Cancer Survivors Boosts Cognition

Increased Physical Activity in Breast Cancer Survivors Boosts Cognition

It is estimated that up to 75 percent of breast cancer survivors experience problems with cognitive difficulties following treatments, perhaps lasting years. Currently, few science-based options are available to help. In the journal Cancer, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report in a pilot study of 87 female breast cancer survivors that an increase in physical activity more than doubled the women’s post-treatment mental processing speed.

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Breast Cancer Study Concludes That Angelina Jolie Effect Was Real

Breast Cancer Study Concludes That Angelina Jolie Effect Was Real

An examination of hospital discharge data in New York State and New South Wales between 2004 and 2014 showed a significant increase in risk-reducing mastectomies starting in May 2013, three months after Jolie’s announcement. Twenty months after Jolie’s announcement, the average rate of preventive surgical breast removals in New York State was 6.3 cases every two months, researchers found. That was almost twice the rate of 3.3 cases every two months 20 months before her announcement. This meant that In just over three years, the number of preventive surgery cases per million women had nearly doubled.

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California becomes the first state to require broad disclosure of chemicals in cleaning products

California becomes the first state to require broad disclosure of chemicals in cleaning products

Any hazardous chemicals found in household cleaning products will have to be clearly disclosed on labels and online under a California law that will be phased in over the next three years. The law is poised to put the state at the front of a national discussion about the rights of consumers to know what dangerous chemicals or allergens may be in common cleaners. The ingredients must be posted online by manufacturers in 2020, and on product labels by 2021.

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Gene test ‘narrows down breast cancer risk’ 

Gene test ‘narrows down breast cancer risk’ 

A gene test informing women how likely they are to develop breast cancer could soon be used on high-risk groups. The Manchester researchers behind the test said it could reduce the number of women having surgery to remove their breasts, by narrowing down their risk. The test, on blood or saliva, looks at 18 genetic variants known to affect the chances of getting breast cancer. Cancer charities said it would have a real impact on women and lead to fewer being diagnosed with the disease.

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What Is Axillary Web Syndrome?

What Is Axillary Web Syndrome?

The National Lymphedema Network reports that AWS has been “found in up to 72 percent of women undergoing axillary node dissection and 20 percent of women undergoing sentinel node dissection in addition to lumpectomy or mastectomy. Even with conservative calculations, tens of thousands of women in the United States develop AWS every year without warning from their medical providers.” NLN argues that although awareness of lymphedema has improved greatly over the past decade, many patients are still unaware of the potential for developing AWS after surgery for breast cancer.

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If You’re Called Back After a Mammogram

If You’re Called Back After a Mammogram

Most of the time, women getting their routine mammogram will receive a letter within 30 days saying the results were normal.
But if doctors find something suspicious, they’ll call you back – usually within just 5 days – to take new pictures or get other tests. Getting that call can be scary, but a suspicious finding does not mean you have cancer.

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Breast reconstruction with flap surgery

Breast reconstruction with flap surgery

Breast reconstruction with flap surgery is a type of breast reconstruction that involves taking a section of tissue from one area of your body — most often your abdomen — and relocating it to create a new breast mound.

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Consumer Product Safety Commission Cracks Down on Flame Retardants Linked to Health Problems

Consumer Product Safety Commission Cracks Down on Flame Retardants Linked to Health Problems

This class of chemicals have been found in the bodies of 97% of Americans says the Center for Disease Control. They have been linked to cancer, neurological deficits, hormone disruption and other health problems. Just last month, a study by the Harvard Chan School of Public Health found that flame retardants reduced the likelihood of clinical pregnancy and live births for women undergoing IVF treatment

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15 Things Not to Say to Someone with Cancer – How to Support Cancer Patients

15 Things Not to Say to Someone with Cancer – How to Support Cancer Patients

This year, more than 318,000 people — the vast majority of them women — will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Chances are, you know someone who is or will be in treatment, but it’s not always easy to find the right thing to say. Even women who have breast cancer admit that, before their diagnosis, they weren’t sure how to support others going through it, and may have inexplicably (and inevitably) said something offensive.

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A new breast cancer study has good news, but not everyone can celebrate equally.

A new breast cancer study has good news, but not everyone can celebrate equally.

A statistical analysis published by the American Cancer Society found that mortality rates from breast cancer fell 39% between 1989 and 2015. The bad news is that black women continue to die from the disease at higher rates than any other demographic. While a lower percentage of black women are dying from the disease overall, their fatality rates are still nearly 40% higher than those of white women, a rate that has remained maddeningly persistent for decades.

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‘Hidden Dangers’ of Mammograms Every Woman Should Know About

‘Hidden Dangers’ of Mammograms Every Woman Should Know About

The conventional screening process carries health risks, both to body and mind, which may outstrip the very dangers the medical surveillance believes itself responsible for, and effective at, mitigating. For instance, according to a groundbreaking study published last November in New England Journal of Medicine, 1.3 million US women were overdiagnosed and overtreated over the past 30 years. These are the ‘false positives’ that were never caught, resulting in the unnecessary irradiation, chemotherapy poisoning and surgery of approximately 43,000 women each year. Now, when you add to this dismal statistic the millions of ‘false positives’ that while being caught nevertheless resulted in producing traumas within those women, breast screening begins to look like a veritable nightmare of iatrogenesis. And this does not even account for the radiobiological dangers of the x-ray mammography screening process itself, which may be causing an epidemic of mostly unackowledged radiation-induced breast cancers in exposed populations.

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‘Cancer Pen’ Could Help Surgeons Spot Tumor Cells in Seconds

‘Cancer Pen’ Could Help Surgeons Spot Tumor Cells in Seconds

A new “cancer pen” promises to help surgeons immediately detect and completely remove cancerous tumor tissue, without having to send samples off to a lab for testing while the patient languishes on the table. The MasSpec Pen is a hand-held device that allows doctors to test in real-time whether tissue is cancerous or not, delivering results in about 10 seconds, researchers report. The pen will make it easier to surgically clear out all the cancer cells surrounding a tumor, explained senior researcher Livia Eberlin, an assistant professor of chemistry with the University of Texas at Austin.

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Why Is Hormone Replacement Therapy So Controversial?

Why Is Hormone Replacement Therapy So Controversial?

The Women’s Health Initiative showed that women on HRT had a higher risk of strokes and breast cancer (Manson et al, JAMA, Oct.2, 2013). During the five-year duration of the study, however, there was no difference in mortality between women taking HRT and those taking placebo. A recent report shows that after 18 years the participants still have no significant differences in mortality (Manson et al, JAMA, Sep. 12, 2017). Women like you who suffer during menopause often feel more comfortable taking estrogen (and progesterone, if indicated) during the time they need to suppress hot flashes. Experts usually recommend the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time.

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Trading Old Hazards for New Ones? Mystery Shrouds Chemicals That Replaced PFOA

Trading Old Hazards for New Ones? Mystery Shrouds Chemicals That Replaced PFOA

Perfluorooctanoic acid, widely used for decades in the making of nonstick coatings like Teflon and a variety of other consumer products, is considered toxic even in tiny amounts. PFOA has been linked to cancer, birth defects and immune system dysfunction.
In 2006, eight major chemical companies, including 3M and DuPont, entered into a “voluntary stewardship agreement” with the US Environmental Protection Agency to phase out the production and use of PFOA by 2015. In its place, the industry switched to other chemicals in the same family that were deemed less hazardous by the EPA. But lately a variety of experts have begun to believe that these new chemicals also pose grave threats to human health. Remarkably, it’s not clear whether government regulators — or even companies like Saint-Gobain — know the specific chemical identities of the substances being substituted for PFOA.

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Alternative and complementary medicine for metastatic breast cancer 

Alternative and complementary medicine for metastatic breast cancer 

Many complementary approaches — those used along with standard medical treatment — may be used to complement your doctor’s care and help you cope with the physical and mental toll of the disease. Together these approaches are often called complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which describes many different products, approaches and treatments that are considered outside standard medical care.

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What Are the Side Effects of Anti-Estrogen Drugs and Immunotherapies? 

What Are the Side Effects of Anti-Estrogen Drugs and Immunotherapies? 

Modern medicine offers several primary ways to treat breast cancer, including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and anti-estrogen treatments. Ongoing investigations of immunotherapies may lead to their wider use in the future. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with breast cancer, your doctor may prescribe a combination of these treatment approaches depending on several factors, including the type and stage of your cancer. As with virtually every treatment currently available, both anti-estrogen drugs and immunotherapies can cause side effects in patients.

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TMIST trial compares 2-D and 3-D mammography

TMIST trial compares 2-D and 3-D mammography

“We need to determine if 3-D mammography is better than 2-D at finding the sort of breast cancers that are most likely to spread and kill women,” said ECOG-ACRIN study chair Etta D. Pisano, M.D., vice chair of research in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor in residence of radiology at Harvard Medical School, Boston. “If a newer screening technology does not reduce the numbers of advanced, life-threatening cancers, then are we really improving screening for breast cancer?” TMIST researchers are collecting data on the results of every mammogram, whether the imaging shows no signs of cancer, findings suspicious of cancer, or a breast cancer. Any medical follow-ups, such as more imaging or biopsies, are also being reported. TMIST researchers intend to follow all participants for breast cancer status, treatment, and outcomes from the time of randomization until the end of the study (at least 2025).

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Immunotherapy, Seeking a Cure With Caution

Immunotherapy, Seeking a Cure With Caution

While immunotherapies offer many promising things and come with the potential for incredible reward, they can also come with a cost. I think that caution is important as we begin dosing these new remedies in to countless more cancer patients in the hopes that they gain that ever-elusive cure just as my sister was able to do.

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Researchers discover mechanism of drug resistance for ovarian and breast cancer cells

Researchers discover mechanism of drug resistance for ovarian and breast cancer cells

Researchers from the RUDN University have found out one of reasons why chemotherapy (in particular, cisplatin) gradually stops affecting the cells of ovarian and breast tumors. The authors study the biochemical mechanisms which allow tumor cells to develop resistance to antitumor drugs. During chemotherapy, when using certain drugs, the tumor cells are affected by toxic and oxidative stress, which stop their functioning. Sometime later, however, the cells “get used” to the drug action, which necessitates using stronger doses of the drug, which, in turn, negatively affects the patient’s organism due to its toxic effect.

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DEXA Scan after Breast Cancer & DIEP flap 

DEXA Scan after Breast Cancer & DIEP flap 

Women who have had breast cancer treatment may be at increased risk for osteoporosis and fracture. Estrogen has a protective effect on bone, and reduced levels of the hormone trigger bone loss. Because of treatment medications or surgery, many breast cancer survivors experience a loss of ovarian function and, consequently, a drop in estrogen levels. Women who were premenopausal before their cancer treatment may go through menopause earlier than those who have not had breast cancer. Results from the NIH-supported Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS) found an increase in fracture risk among breast cancer survivors.

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10 Ways To Get Plastic Out Of Your Kitchen 

10 Ways To Get Plastic Out Of Your Kitchen 

Plastics seem to invade every aspect of our lives, and the kitchen is no exception. From cooking to storage to packing food for on the go, there are places that we can ditch the plastic in favor of safer, more Earth-friendly materials. Take some time to inventory the plastic in your kitchen and see if your kitchen can go plastic-free. It’s easier than you think!

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Nightly fasting may help reduce breast cancer risk

Nightly fasting may help reduce breast cancer risk

Women who fasted for less than 13 hours a night had a 36% higher risk for breast cancer recurrence, compared with those who fasted for 13 or more hours. No link emerged between shorter fasting time and death from breast cancer or mortality from any other cause. Patients with early stage breast cancer who fasted for longer had significantly lower concentrations of HbA1c and longer sleep duration.

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Hair growth after chemo: When does hair grow back?

Hair growth after chemo: When does hair grow back?

Most people receiving chemotherapy will begin seeing a limited amount of thin, fuzzy hair a few weeks after their last treatment. Real hair starts to grow properly within a month or two of the last treatment. A small fraction of people who are given chemotherapy may never regrow their hair. Specific drugs increase the risk of permanent hair loss. The breast cancer drug docetaxel, which is sold under the brand name Taxotere, has been known to cause permanent hair loss in some people.

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Nerve Damage after Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

Nerve Damage after Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

Many women who receive taxane-based chemotherapy to treat breast cancer experience long-term peripheral neuropathy, according to follow-up data from a large clinical trial. Two years after the start of treatment, more than 40% of participants in the trial said they still experienced numbness and tingling in their hands or feetExit Disclaimer, and 10% rated their symptoms as severe. Patients with severe neuropathy reported lower quality of life than patients without severe symptoms.

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There’s a Hidden Carcinogen Tainting Tap Water and Consumer Products Nationwide

There’s a Hidden Carcinogen Tainting Tap Water and Consumer Products Nationwide

Because of its wide use and potential harm, 1,4-dioxane is one of the first 10 chemicals the Environmental Protection Agency picked for review under the nation’s new chemical safety law. But the review could take years, and even then there’s no guarantee the EPA will do anything: The agency has failed to set standards for any new drinking water contaminant in more than 20 years.

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Can a Blood Test Detect a Range of Cancers Earlier?

Can a Blood Test Detect a Range of Cancers Earlier?

A new genetic blood test might pave the way for detecting early stage cancers that often prove fatal when caught too late, a new study suggests. The test detected stage 1 or 2 colon, breast, lung or ovarian cancers between 59 percent and 71 percent of the time when assessing 200 patients previously diagnosed with cancer, researchers found.

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When Cancer’s Side Effects Return

When Cancer’s Side Effects Return

I am grateful. I try to pull my thoughts back into the moment. I use my emotional coping tools, and I am grateful for each and every day—every moment and everyone in my life. Gratitude is a terrific emotion. I try to use it to counteract grumpiness about lingering side effects impacting my currently broken foot. I am here and I try to remember that is more than enough.

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Breast Cancer News: A Look Back at 2017

Breast Cancer News: A Look Back at 2017

With the holiday season in full swing, it’s the perfect opportunity to take a look back at 2017. It’s been a year full of ups and downs, and while there were definitely quite a few low moments, there were certainly quite a few highs. To celebrate the year that was,...

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A New Food Label Is Coming Soon and It Goes ‘Beyond Organic’

A New Food Label Is Coming Soon and It Goes ‘Beyond Organic’

Conscious consumers won’t have to wait much longer for clear guidance on how to buy food and other products that are not only certified organic, but also certified regenerative. The Rodale Institute unveiled draft standards for a new Regenerative Organic Certification, developed by Rodale and a coalition of farmers, ranchers, nonprofits, scientists and brands.
When finalized, the certification will go “beyond organic” by establishing higher standards for soil health and land management, animal welfare and farmer and worker fairness.

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Breast Cancer ‘Immunotherapy’ Helps Some With Tough-to-Treat Disease 

Breast Cancer ‘Immunotherapy’ Helps Some With Tough-to-Treat Disease 

Women with a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer who responded to an new immune-focused drug gained a significant survival benefit, a new study shows. The patients all had what’s known as advanced, “triple-negative” breast cancers. “Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer often affecting younger women and, unfortunately, the current treatment options for metastatic disease remain limited,” explained Dr. Peter Schmid. He directs the Breast Centre at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital and Barts Cancer Institute in London, England. However, oncologists also stressed that many women who took the new drug, called Tecentriq (atezolizumab), failed to respond.

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‘Breast Cancer Genes’: How Much Do They Increase Cancer Risk?

‘Breast Cancer Genes’: How Much Do They Increase Cancer Risk?

Women who carry genetic mutations in the “breast cancer genes,” called BRCA1 and BRCA2, have about a 70 percent chance of developing breast cancer in their lifetimes, according to a new study.
But the new study also found that breast cancer risk in women with these mutations could vary — by as much as twofold — depending on whether the women had specific mutations within their genes. In addition, having close family members with the disease also indicated a greater increase in risk, the study found.

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Are Menopausal Women Taking a Big Risk with HRT? 

Are Menopausal Women Taking a Big Risk with HRT? 

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) does not appear to increase the risk of death from either heart disease or cancer. That’s what researchers concluded by analyzing data from the long-running Women’s Health Initiative study.

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Stem Cells Deliver Chemo to Metastatic Breast Cancer

Stem Cells Deliver Chemo to Metastatic Breast Cancer

Researchers have used modified stem cells to deliver a cancer drug selectively to metastatic breast cancer tumors in mice. The stem cells specifically targeted metastatic tumors by homing in on the stiff environment that typically surrounds them.

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Detecting early signs of cancer in the blood

Detecting early signs of cancer in the blood

Using this method, the team screened the blood samples for mutations within 58 known cancer-related genes. They detected no tumor-derived mutations in the blood samples from the healthy people. However, in the samples from patients with colorectal, breast, lung, or ovarian cancer, the technique identified tumor-related DNA mutations in 48 of 62 patients (77%) with advanced cancer (stages III and IV) and in 86 of 138 patients (62%) with stage I or stage II cancer.

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Scientists Warn Chemotherapy Treatment May Encourage Aggressive Tumors and Spread Cancer

Scientists Warn Chemotherapy Treatment May Encourage Aggressive Tumors and Spread Cancer

In the study, mice with breast cancer who were given chemotherapy, had double the number of cancer cells in the lungs and bloodstream, compared to mice that did not receive the treatment. Moreover, scientists found that chemotherapy made blood vessels more permeable to cancer cells. Immune cells that transport cancer cells also increased. Chemotherapy has been found to promote cancer spread in humans as well. In twenty patients who received chemotherapy drugs, it was discovered that tumor microenvironments became increasingly favorable for cancer metastasis.

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Medicinal Mushrooms

Medicinal Mushrooms

Mushrooms are being studied to find out how they affect the immune system and if they stop or slow the growth of tumors or kill tumor cells. It is thought that certain chemical compounds, such as polysaccharides in turkey tail mushrooms, strengthen the immune system to fight cancer.

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Want Cancer? Eat Plenty of Refined Sugar, Say Researchers

Want Cancer? Eat Plenty of Refined Sugar, Say Researchers

Food choice plays an important role in whether or not a woman develops breast cancer during her lifetime. In the study, lab mice were given one of three diets: either high in fructose or sucrose similar to the typical Western diet, starch-rich meals or a control group with a low-sugar and starch diet. The results were sobering. After six months, 30 percent of mice fed starches developed breast cancer, while the sugar-rich diet mice had a 50-58 percent breast cancer rate, compared to the control group. “We determined that it was specifically fructose, in table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, ubiquitous within our food system, which was responsible for facilitating lung metastasis and 12-HETE production in breast tumors,” said co-author Lorenzo Cohen, Ph.D., professor of Palliative, Rehabilitation, and Integrative Medicine at MD Anderson.

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Study: Pregnancy Doesn’t Increase Chances of Breast Cancer Recurrence

Study: Pregnancy Doesn’t Increase Chances of Breast Cancer Recurrence

A particular concern of breast cancer recurrence is raised for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors because this type of breast cancer is fueled by the hormone estrogen, of which levels increase during pregnancy. This could cause an unwanted growth of cancer cells that potentially remained in the body after treatment. However, this study shows no differences in survival among ER-positive cancer participants that became pregnant, compared to those who did not. When it came to ER-negative cancer participants, a significant difference was found in the survival of participants. Pregnancy lowered the chances of dying by 42 percent in this group of survivors.

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Soy foods, cruciferous vegetables may reduce breast cancer treatment’s side effects

Soy foods, cruciferous vegetables may reduce breast cancer treatment’s side effects

In the study, published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, higher intake of cruciferous vegetables and soy foods were associated with fewer reports of menopausal symptoms. Higher soy intake was also associated with less reported fatigue. The breast cancer survivors studied included 173 non-Hispanic white and 192 Chinese Americans including US-born Chinese and Chinese immigrants.

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Janssen and Leading Advocacy Organizations Introduce Cancer.com, a Customizable Online Destination for People Impacted by Cancer

Janssen and Leading Advocacy Organizations Introduce Cancer.com, a Customizable Online Destination for People Impacted by Cancer

The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson are proud to announce the launch of Cancer.com, an online destination providing those impacted by cancer with useful information and tools at the right time. It features content tailored to each visitor by cancer type, topics of interest, and where they are in their care journey. Cancer.com also offers support tools to help visitors build skills to navigate life with cancer. It was created by Janssen Oncology in collaboration with leading patient advocacy organizations: the American Cancer Society, CancerCare, and Cancer Support Community.

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HR+, HER2– Advanced Breast Cancer Therapy Faslodex Approved As First-Line Treatment

HR+, HER2– Advanced Breast Cancer Therapy Faslodex Approved As First-Line Treatment

Peter A. Kaufman, MD of the Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, said: “This new indication for Faslodex offers another treatment option for women living with HR+, HER2- advanced or metastatic breast cancer with disease progression after endocrine therapy. The study supporting this indication demonstrated that Faslodex used in combination with abemaciclib significantly improves progression-free survival compared to Faslodex and placebo.”

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The Terrible 10 Foods That Contain Monsanto Roundup 

The Terrible 10 Foods That Contain Monsanto Roundup 

I’m guessing that you wouldn’t intentionally swallow Monsanto’s Roundup, particularly after it has been classified as a probable carcinogen by the World Health Organization and has recently been added to California’s list of cancer-causing substances. But you may be getting a lot more of the main ingredient, known as glyphosate, than you want in your daily diet. That’s because a recent study by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) found the highest amount of glyphosate in foods most people might never suspect as problematic. Worse than that, the study found that nearly one-third of all foods tested now contain glyphosate.

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GE Clears First Mammography System That Lets Patients Control Breast Compression

GE Clears First Mammography System That Lets Patients Control Breast Compression

GE Healthcare won FDA clearance for the first mammography system, the Senographe Pristina Dueta, that lets women undergoing an exam to control how much the device compresses the breasts. As the woman is prepared for the exam, she is handed a small remote control that has a plus and minus buttons on it. The breast is then positioned by the technologist between the compression plates and from then on the patient has control in terms of how much compression she’s willing to take.

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Breast, Other Cancers Found at Early Stages Using Blood Samples in Study

Breast, Other Cancers Found at Early Stages Using Blood Samples in Study

Using a modern DNA sequencing technique, Johns Hopkins researchers have come one step closer to diagnosing early-stage cancer patients with a simple blood draw. The method reads free circulating DNA in a patient’s blood and detects common cancer mutations. While further refinement is needed, it was able to identify three out of every five people with early-stage colorectal, ovarian, breast or lung cancer.

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Should You Worry About Your Cell Phone and Cancer?

Should You Worry About Your Cell Phone and Cancer?

Here is a link to the California Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control of the California Department of Public Health. The overview states:
“Although the science is still evolving , some laboratory experiments and human health studies have suggested the possibility that long-term, high use of cell phones may be linked to certain types of cancer and other health effects

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5 Foods That Can Mess With Your Hormones 

5 Foods That Can Mess With Your Hormones 

We already know that there are a lot of elements in our environment that interfere with our hormones. Even something as simple as light pollution can throw them out of whack. Heck, we even electively choose to alter our natural hormonal clocks with medications. With all these assailants present in our environment, you may be interested in eliminating hormonal impactors wherever possible. A great place to start? Your food. Steer clear of these five foods that are known to impact hormonal balance

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How Many Breast Cancer Survivors Suffer Nerve Pain? 

How Many Breast Cancer Survivors Suffer Nerve Pain? 

Two new studies show that women treated for early stage breast cancer may suffer from the numbness, tingling or pain of peripheral neuropathy in their feet for years afterwards. Relatively few studies of chemotherapy effectiveness actually follow up on such side effects, which can have a big impact on quality of life. To determine how common peripheral neuropathy might be, the investigators examined data from more than 1,500 breast cancer patients in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-30. After two years of treatment, about 42 percent of the patients reported neuropathy, with 10 percent in severe pain. Analysis showed that lower-dose docetaxel combinations to treat this cancer were less likely to trigger peripheral neuropathy. However, older or heavier breast cancer survivors appear to be more vulnerable.

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Trigger Happy With Toxins 

Trigger Happy With Toxins 

Once upon a time, biotech companies selling genetically engineered crops had a fig leaf of cover to claim their products were absolutely non-toxic. Today, we have nothing but the naked truth. The new varieties come with instructions to shower them in toxic herbicides. How on earth can that be good in any way?

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Likely Carcinogen Contaminates Drinking Water of 90 Million Americans, Report Finds

Likely Carcinogen Contaminates Drinking Water of 90 Million Americans, Report Finds

According to a new report by the nonprofit Environmental Working Group, the drinking water of more than a quarter of Americans — some 90 million people — tested postive for a likely carcinogen known as 1,4-dioxane between 2010 and 2015. And public water systems serving more than 7 million people in 27 states have average 1,4-dioxane concentrations that exceed the level US Environmental Protection Agency has said can increase the risk of cancer.

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The FDA Has Fast-Tracked A First-Of-Its Kind Cancer Treatment

The FDA Has Fast-Tracked A First-Of-Its Kind Cancer Treatment

Targeting tumors based off of genetic traits could help researchers and clinicians to more accurately target and treat cancers. Instead of just targeting the physical location of the tumor, treatments could be further tailored to the unique genetic profile of the individual patient. While this specific drug would only be effective for about four percent of cancer patients (though this would still help tens of thousands of patients), it could lead to a future where tumors are better targeted with genetic testing.

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Study Finds Painting Your Nails Is Messing With Your Hormones 

Study Finds Painting Your Nails Is Messing With Your Hormones 

A new Duke University-Environmental Working Group (EWG) study published in the medical journal Environment International found that the hormone disruptor triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) found in nail polish (even some seemingly “natural” ones) showed up in every woman the researchers tested, if they had recently painted their nails. The researchers tested ten different brands of nail polishes to determine which ones contained the hormone disruptor: eight of the nail polish brands contained TPHP, including two brands that did not list the ingredient on the label.

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Triple-negative breast cancer: What you need to know

Triple-negative breast cancer: What you need to know

Triple-negative breast cancer is different from the three more common types of breast cancer. It is harder to treat and aggressive.
Because it is aggressive and rare, battling triple-negative breast cancer can be difficult, and fewer treatment options are available.

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Breast cancer charities: How to make an impact

Breast cancer charities: How to make an impact

When it comes to pink ribbon products, the portion of proceeds that goes directly toward breast cancer charities varies. Some companies have faced criticism for using the pink ribbon as a marketing tool while they donate very little to the cause itself. Breast Cancer Action’s Think Before You Pink campaign recommends asking a few important questions before purchasing pink ribbon products.

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Holiday Buyers Beware: 9 Retailers Who Got an ‘F’ Rating for Failing to Take Action on Dangerous Chemicals in Consumer Products

Holiday Buyers Beware: 9 Retailers Who Got an ‘F’ Rating for Failing to Take Action on Dangerous Chemicals in Consumer Products

Parents shouldn’t have to worry whether their children’s car seat contains cancer-causing flame retardants. We shouldn’t have to wonder whether the fragrance in our teenage daughter’s shampoo is formulated with hormone-disrupting phthalates, or if our food is packaged with extremely persistent chemicals like poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).

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CAR T Cells: Engineering Immune Cells to Treat Cancer

CAR T Cells: Engineering Immune Cells to Treat Cancer

A rapidly emerging immunotherapy approach is called adoptive cell transfer (ACT): collecting and using patients’ own immune cells to treat their cancer. There are several types of ACT (see “ACT: TILs, TCRs, and CARs”), but the one that is closest to producing a treatment approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is called CAR T-cell therapy.

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Breast reconstruction surgery: Options and what to expect

Breast reconstruction surgery: Options and what to expect

The two main types of breast reconstruction surgery are:

Implants or prosthetics: This involves surgery using silicone or saline implants.
Autologous or skin flap surgery: This method uses tissue from another area of the body.
In some cases, a combination of both techniques may be used to reconstruct the breast more naturally.

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Publication details

Author: Janet Maker, Ph.D.  |  Publication Date: February, 2017  |  
Distributor: Ingram | Trim: 6×9 | Format: Hardcover, Paperback, eBook
ISBN (Hardcover) 978-0-9976619-0-3 | ISBN (Paperback) 978-0-9976619-1-0 | ISBN (eBook) 978-0-9976619-2-7
Published by Jane Thomas Press

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