Breast Cancer News

The newsletter provides a selection of recent articles in the media related to breast cancer. Subscribe on the right to have the weekly roundup emailed to you.

Study Casts More Doubt on Value of Mammograms 

Study Casts More Doubt on Value of Mammograms 

Mammograms frequently detect small breast tumors that might never become life-threatening, causing women to receive treatment they likely don’t need, a new Danish study finds. About one in every three women between the ages of 50 and 69 who was diagnosed with breast cancer wound up having a tumor that posed no immediate threat to her health, the researchers reported. At the same time, mammography did not reduce the number of advanced breast cancers found in women in the study. “This means that breast screening is unlikely to improve breast cancer survival or reduce the use of invasive surgery,” said study author Dr. Karsten Juhl Jorgensen, deputy director of research for the Nordic Cochrane Center at the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen. “It also means that breast screening leads to unnecessary detection and treatment of many breast cancers.”

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Cost of Breast Cancer Treatment

Cost of Breast Cancer Treatment

For patients covered by health insurance, out-of-pocket costs for breast cancer treatment typically consist of doctor visit, lab and prescription drug copays as well as coinsurance of 10%-50% for surgery and other procedures, which can easily reach the yearly out-of-pocket maximum. Breast cancer treatment typically is covered by health insurance, although some plans might not cover individual drugs or treatments.

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Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Living Longer Than Ever, Thanks to Better Treatments

Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Living Longer Than Ever, Thanks to Better Treatments

“Even though this group of patients with MBC is increasing in size, our findings are favorable,” Angela Mariotto, data analytics chief at NCI’s Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, said in a press release. “This is because, over time, these women are living longer with MBC. Longer survival with MBC means increased needs for services and research. Our study helps to document this need.”

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7 Tips to Help You Find the Right Oncologist

7 Tips to Help You Find the Right Oncologist

After being diagnosed with cancer, the first thing to do is find a good oncologist. Cancer treatment is tough, so it’s important to find an oncologist who supports and cares for their patients in a way you would want to be supported and cared for. We’ve put together a list of tips for finding the right oncologist with information from cancerdocs.org.

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This Is How Much Cancer Really Costs America 

This Is How Much Cancer Really Costs America 

Treating cancer is expensive and according to the American Cancer Society, the cost isn’t just incurred by the patient, but society as a whole. Here are some interesting economic facts and stats about cancer and cancer treatment in the U.S

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Study estimates number of U.S. women living with metastatic breast cancer

Study estimates number of U.S. women living with metastatic breast cancer

A new study shows that the number of women in the United States living with distant metastatic breast cancer (MBC), the most severe form of the disease, is growing. Researchers came to this finding by estimating the number of U.S. women living with MBC, or breast cancer that has spread to distant sites in the body, including women who were initially diagnosed with metastatic disease, and those who developed MBC after an initial diagnosis at an earlier stage.

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Researchers identify nutrient metabolism that drives breast tumor metastasis

Researchers identify nutrient metabolism that drives breast tumor metastasis

A multinational group of scientists, has discovered that breast cancer cells that have invaded other organs rely on a different nutrient metabolism to produce energy than normal cells and non-metastasizing cancer cells. This discovery could result in new breast cancer therapies that prevent metastases by targeting this metabolic process. These groundbreaking insights are published in the leading scientific journal Nature Communications.

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Breakthrough: Breast cancer relapse linked to fat metabolism 

Breakthrough: Breast cancer relapse linked to fat metabolism 

The researchers identified a chemical signature in the way that residual cells metabolized lipids. The altered process contributed to maintaining high levels of reactive oxygen species, which are molecules known to harm DNA. The team believes that this may play a role in triggering a relapse. Other scientists will now be able to examine these cellular differences and get to the bottom of how lipid metabolism might influence cancer relapse. Kristina Havas, one of the scientists involved in the current project, has high hopes, saying, “Every patient is different, and every story is unique, but our results suggest that lipid metabolism is an exciting therapeutic target to reduce breast cancer recurrence.”

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“First in Human” Highlights NCI Immunotherapy Research

“First in Human” Highlights NCI Immunotherapy Research

The forthcoming Discovery Channel special, First in Human, will feature some of the groundbreaking work on cancer immunotherapy being done at the NIH Clinical Center. The three-part series—scheduled to run on August 10, 17, and 24—will feature NCI researchers and staff leading trials of a type of immune-based cellular therapy known as adoptive cell transfer (ACT)

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A New Test That Detects Cancer Earlier

A New Test That Detects Cancer Earlier

This test, known as a liquid biopsy, could buy some crucial time for doctors by indicating that cancerous cells are present in the body when tumors are detectable on CT scans and long before the patient has any physical symptoms. The liquid biopsies also showed whether the chemotherapy treatment was working or if the disease had become resistant, as is what happens in the majority of stage 2 and 3 cancers. In future, this could allow doctors to switch to a more effective drug and spare patients grueling treatment for nothing.

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Breast Cancer Diagnosis Means Your Mom Needs Your Help

Breast Cancer Diagnosis Means Your Mom Needs Your Help

As a mother who had cancer, I wanted my children to have fun and keep their normal routine as much as possible. I had children so they would grow to be strong and independent, kind people. It would have killed me if they were crying all the time, or constantly worried about my health. That said, these are some other things that can do to help your mom during her breast cancer battle.

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Is It Safe To Cook With Aluminum Foil?

Is It Safe To Cook With Aluminum Foil?

We know aluminum in deodorant is bad for us, but how much aluminum do we actually absorb when we, say, cook a baked potato in foil on the grill? Is it dangerous to cook with aluminum? On the one hand, the metals we cook in definitely leach into our foods. In fact, cooking in a cast iron pan is often suggested for those who are iron deficient. In a similar way, cooking with aluminum increases aluminum levels within the body. In fact, one study found that the amount of aluminum that leaches from foil into food during the cooking process is well above the permissible limit set by the World Health Organization.

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Breast Cancer Lesion-finding Device Called LoCalizer Wins FDA Approval

Breast Cancer Lesion-finding Device Called LoCalizer Wins FDA Approval

Manufactured by Health Beacons, LOCalizer is a wireless radiofrequency identification device that helps surgeons locate non-palpable breast lesions with more precision than traditional methods. A non-palpable lesion is one that cannot be felt or does not form a discrete mass. “As the industry gets better at detecting smaller breast lesions, we must establish a new gold standard for breast lesion localization,” Donogh O’Driscoll, chief operating officer of Faxitron, said in a press release. “LOCalizer could be the breakthrough needed to make lumpectomies and breast biopsies safer, more efficient and a better experience for both providers and patients.

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Breast Cancer Disparity Between Blacks and Whites May Be Due to Genetics

Breast Cancer Disparity Between Blacks and Whites May Be Due to Genetics

“People have long associated breast cancer mortality in black women with poverty, or stress, or lack of access to care, but our results show that much of the increased risk for black women can be attributed to tumor biological differences, which are probably genetically determined,” Dr. Olufunmilayo Olopade, the study’s senior author, said in a news release. “The good news,” she said, “is that as we learn more about these genetic variations, we can combine that information with clinical data to stratify risk and better predict recurrences — especially for highly treatable cancers — and develop interventions to improve treatment outcomes.”

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10 Powerful Cancer Fighting Herbs

10 Powerful Cancer Fighting Herbs

When it comes to cancer, we can never have enough weapons at our disposal to fight it. And, while the internet is full of misinformation on herbs and cancer, I thought it was time to get down to the best, research-documented herbs to help those fighting the disease.

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Growing Evidence Points to a Specific Diet That Can Starve Cancer Cells of Their Prime Fuels 

Growing Evidence Points to a Specific Diet That Can Starve Cancer Cells of Their Prime Fuels 

We subscribe to the metabolic theory of cancer—the proven fact that cancer cells are fueled by sugar and that altered mitochondrial metabolism is the ultimate cause of cancer. In fact, a December 2016 meta-analysis research paper assessed more than 200 studies conducted between 1934 and 2016 and concluded that the most important difference between normal cells and cancer cells is how they respire, or create energy. Cancer cells use a primitive process of fermentation to inefficiently convert glucose from carbohydrates into energy needed to sustain their rapid growth. But the most important finding is that fatty acids (dietary fats) cannot be fermented by cancer cells, which makes a ketogenic diet the most powerful dietary approach to cancer identified to date.

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Deciding whether to pursue an alternative cancer therapy 

Deciding whether to pursue an alternative cancer therapy 

Alternative therapies are those that are used in place of palliative treatment such as chemotherapy and radiation. There are a wide variety of alternative treatments available. How to decide? At this point, you are entering uncharted waters. However, orthodox therapy may be equally uncharted or, worse yet, have been clearly demonstrated not to work very well for your condition.

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Does Poor Air Quality Actually Cause Cancer?

Does Poor Air Quality Actually Cause Cancer?

The average — age-adjusted — rate for all cancers came out at 451 cases per 100,000 people. However, people living in areas with poorer environmental quality were far more likely to suffer, with around 39 extra cases per 100,000 people than in areas of high environmental quality. The increased cancer rates were suffered by both men and women, with prostate and breast cancers showing a strong association.

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10 Common Emotional Responses to a Cancer Diagnosis

10 Common Emotional Responses to a Cancer Diagnosis

A cancer diagnosis can throw a person and their loved ones into emotional turmoil. It’s perfectly normal for anyone diagnosed with cancer to go through a whole range of emotions, often several in a day. Coping with cancer can be as difficult emotionally as it is physically, and those feelings may continue through treatment and even years after recovery.

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Three-week radiation therapy treatment given post mastectomy is safe and effective

Three-week radiation therapy treatment given post mastectomy is safe and effective

A shorter course of radiation therapy given to breast cancer patients following mastectomy is safe and effective and cuts treatment time in half. That is according to data from a phase II clinical trial conducted by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey investigators and other colleagues who examined a hypofractionated regimen given over three weeks versus the traditional six week course of treatment. The work appears in the current online edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Coping as a Mother with Breast Cancer – Breast Cancer News

Coping as a Mother with Breast Cancer – Breast Cancer News

Coping as both a mother and having breast cancer are two difficult challenges. Both require your time, energy, attention and emotional stability. Even though going through breast cancer and raising two young children seems too much to handle, the kids are the ones who helped me survive. When the world seems like a dark place, your children become the light at the end of the tunnel.

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The Genetics of Cancer

The Genetics of Cancer

Genetic changes that promote cancer can be inherited from our parents if the changes are present in germ cells, which are the reproductive cells of the body (eggs and sperm). Such changes, called germline changes, are found in every cell of the offspring. Cancer-causing genetic changes can also be acquired during one’s lifetime, as the result of errors that occur as cells divide or from exposure to substances, such as certain chemicals in tobacco smoke, and radiation, such as ultraviolet rays from the sun, that damage DNA. Genetic changes that occur after conception are called somatic (or acquired) changes.

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Testing Precision Screening for Breast Cancer

Testing Precision Screening for Breast Cancer

Last year,researchers in California launched a clinical trial to test a new approach to breast cancer screening. The Women Informed to Screen Depending on Measures of RiskExit Disclaimer (WISDOM) clinical trial is using several measures, such as safety, to compare annual mammography with a more individualized approach called risk-based screening.

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Teen Invents Bra that Could Detect Breast Cancer

Teen Invents Bra that Could Detect Breast Cancer

18-year-old Julian Rios Cantu is the designer of the Eva bra: a bra with biosensors inside the lining that can moderate the temperature, texture, blood flow, and coloring of a woman’s breasts. The user only needs to wear the Eva bra for one to two hours per week in order for the apparel to properly monitor the body’s patterns and conditions. All the data is then downloaded by Bluetooth to an app that will alert the user if there is any alarming changes.

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Elevated Cancer Rates Linked to Environmental Quality

Elevated Cancer Rates Linked to Environmental Quality

Researchers have found a link between environmental quality and cancer incidence across the U.S. “Our study is the first we are aware of to address the impact of cumulative environmental exposures on cancer incidence,” said Dr. Jyotsna Jagai of the University of Illinois, who led the research team.

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Pollution Linked With Higher Risk For Breast Cancer Precursor 

Pollution Linked With Higher Risk For Breast Cancer Precursor 

A new study shows that women who live in heavily polluted areas may be more likely to have dense breasts, which is a known risk factor for breast cancer.
The study, published in Breast Cancer Research, finds that the chance of having dense breasts rose by 4% for every 1-unit increase in fine particle concentration. (Pollution is measured by the levels of fine particles in the atmosphere.) Dense breasts have always been considered hereditary, but the new study suggests they may due to environmental factors. Additionally, mammograms have a harder time spotting potentially cancerous areas in dense breasts, increasing the likelihood that cancer may go undetected.

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It’s Shockingly Easy To Find Products With These 10 Toxic Chemicals 

It’s Shockingly Easy To Find Products With These 10 Toxic Chemicals 

For decades, America’s main chemical safety law offered virtually no protection against toxic chemicals that flooded the market. Badly outmoded and outdated, the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 could not even restrict a known carcinogen like asbestos. Fortunately, last year, an overwhelming bipartisan majority in Congress passed legislation to reform the law, starting with the review of those first 10 chemicals – among other important responsibilities and actions required under the new law. It’s now up to us to make sure the Trump administration follows through so workers, kids, pregnant women and the rest of us get the protection we deserve.

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Detection: Is thermography the future for breast cancer? 

Detection: Is thermography the future for breast cancer? 

According to recent studies, mammogram screenings may not lead to fewer deaths but may instead lead to over-diagnosis. The results were based on research where there were high levels of screening. More tumors were diagnosed, but breast cancer death rates were no lower than in areas with fewer screenings. Clearly, if your goal is to adopt early detection as part of your wellness journey, you need to add complementary tools into the mix to balance an over-dependence on mammogram screenings alone. Thermography is a complementary tool for very early detection. Also known as Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging (DITI), thermography is a non-invasive test of physiology that can alert your doctors to changes that could indicate early stages of breast disease.

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CancerLocator identifies disease from blood sample

CancerLocator identifies disease from blood sample

Researchers at the University of California-Los Angeles have developed a computer program that can simultaneously detect cancer and identify from a patient’s blood sample where in the body the cancer is located. The scientists call the program CancerLocator, which works by measuring tumor DNA circulating in the blood.

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Breast cancer genes: Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 

Breast cancer genes: Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 

The BRCA genes are the best known, but are involved in only 1 out of 4 cases of breast cancer with a hereditary component. Most breast cancers are not familial. About 70 percent have been considered sporadic. Does that mean they are not genetic? Not at all. Dozens of genes are now known to contribute to breast cancer, most of them in only a small way, probably in concert with other genes and through interaction with the environment. One researcher has speculated that there may be upwards of 100 more such genes still to be found, and not all the ones that look suspicious will turn out to be harmful.

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Worldwide statistics on breast cancer: Diagnosis and risk factors

Worldwide statistics on breast cancer: Diagnosis and risk factors

The breast cancer incidence, or the number of cases per 100,000 women, is still lower in developing countries overall than in the West, but death rates from the disease are higher. This may be attributed to later diagnosis and poor access to treatment. By contrast, the rate of breast cancer per 100,000 women is higher in the U.S., Canada, and Europe than it is in developing countries. Conversely, death rates are markedly lower.

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Breast rashes: Which symptoms suggest cancer? 

Breast rashes: Which symptoms suggest cancer? 

Most of the time, rashes are not cancer. However, because they can be a sign of cancer, rashes and skin changes should be examined by a doctor. Detecting breast cancer as early as possible increases the chances of successful treatment and a cure.

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Breast Cancer and Fractures Study Leads to New Bone-Loss Guidelines

Breast Cancer and Fractures Study Leads to New Bone-Loss Guidelines

A study suggesting that breast cancer patients on aromatase-inhibitors (AIs) are at higher risk of fractures has prompted several international medical associations to revise guidelines aimed at preventing bone loss in these patients. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy, a family history of hip fractures, and low weight also can raise the risk of fractures, the study’s authors noted. They called for additional research to examine the role these factors play in breast cancer patients experiencing fractures.

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Metastatic breast cancers: Characterising the profile of metastases for improved treatment 

Metastatic breast cancers: Characterising the profile of metastases for improved treatment 

This study suggests that at least one metastatic lesion (if possible several) should be biopsied and analysed at the time of the breast cancer recurrence, especially if the recurrence comes several years after the initial cancer given the possible modifications in the particular genomic profile of the metastatic disease. The determination of the genomic profile using high throughput sequencing techniques targeting a set of predefined and clinically relevant aberrations could be useful for making the therapeutic decision, in particular for the choice of targeted treatments.

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For women at risk of hereditary breast cancer, multigene test could help extend life expectancy

For women at risk of hereditary breast cancer, multigene test could help extend life expectancy

Value in Health, the official journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR), has announced the publication of new research indicating that testing for variants in 7 cancer-associated genes (versus the usual process of testing in just 2 genes) followed by risk-reduction management could cost-effectively improve life expectancy for women at risk of hereditary breast cancer.

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Almost Half Of Personal Care Products Contain This Carcinogen

Almost Half Of Personal Care Products Contain This Carcinogen

The chemical 1,4-dioxane is a harmful carcinogen—and guess what: it is in 46 percent of personal care products on the US market. However, the chemical 1,4-dioxane is likely not going to appear on any product label. That is because 1,4-dioxane is actually a byproduct that is created through the combination of other chemicals. It doesn’t technically have to be included on the ingredients list because it isn’t directly added into personal care products. It lurks, unlisted.

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New bone-in technique tests therapies for breast cancer metastasis 

New bone-in technique tests therapies for breast cancer metastasis 

“We have created an experimental system in which we can mimic the interactions between cancer cells and bone cells, as bone is the place where breast cancer, and many other cancers too, disseminates most frequently,” said Zhang, who also is a McNair Scholar at Baylor. “We have developed a system that allows us to test many different drug responses simultaneously to discover the therapy that can selectively act on metastatic cancer cells and minimize the effect on the bone.”

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The Case of the Incredible Disappearing Cancer Patients!

Kate no longer has cancer. She paid, from her own pocket, for her trip to a clinic in Mexico. After the trip, her cancer disappeared. She had medical insurance. But her insurance wouldn’t pay for her trip. Insurance pays for treatments, not for cures. It pays for treatments, even if they fail. But it does not pay for success. Success disappears. There are two ways for a cancer patient to disappear. You might be cured by health. Or you might be cured by a medicine that is not approved. In both cases, the medical system will ignore the cure, and ignore the patient.

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Misunderstood Gene Tests May Lead to Unnecessary Mastectomies

Misunderstood Gene Tests May Lead to Unnecessary Mastectomies

Close to half of breast cancer patients who chose to have a double mastectomy after genetic testing didn’t actually have the gene mutations known to raise the risk of additional cancers, a new survey found. “That was a bit surprising, because we wouldn’t typically expect that surgery to be conducted for women if they don’t have a risk-causing gene mutation,” said lead researcher Dr. Allison Kurian. The finding suggests that many women and their doctors aren’t interpreting the results of genetic testing properly, she added.

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Breast Cancer Survivor Story: 6 Things I Would Do Differently Today If Diagnosed With Cancer

Breast Cancer Survivor Story: 6 Things I Would Do Differently Today If Diagnosed With Cancer

Breast cancer is a multi-faceted disease and must be dealt with from many different angles – a holistic approach. My best advice is to be an empowered patient – to do your research and don’t just blindly trust what the men and women in the white coats tell you to do. You need to be an active participant in your own healing on every level. One closing tip: Do some investigative work. Try to discover why you got cancer in the first place. For some, it’s nutritional. For others it’s too much stress, or an inability to methylate properly, or a toxic workplace. If you can identify the source of your cancer and correct those issues, you will have a much better chance of fully healing from cancer and being healthier than ever. I wish you abundant healing.

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What a Doctor Wants People to Know About Chronic Illnesses 

What a Doctor Wants People to Know About Chronic Illnesses 

Some of the things she wants to share about people with chronic illnesses include the fact that being unable to work should not be viewed as a vacation, people with chronic illnesses suffer a complex range of symptoms including emotional symptoms, fatigue is not the same as feeling tired, and controversially, that many doctors don’t fully understand chronic illnesses.

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Potential new treatment found for ‘chemo brain’ 

Potential new treatment found for ‘chemo brain’ 

“In our preliminary results, we found that hydrogen peroxide temporarily increases in the brains of chemotherapy-treated rats. Because hydrogen peroxide is a reactive oxygen species and potentially damaging, it may have an effect on cognitive function. Additionally, we may have a therapy that can serve as a preventative in order to treat it. We found that KU-32 prevents cognitive impairment, and our preliminary neurochemical data suggest that it may prevent increases in hydrogen peroxide production.”

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Breast thermography: Technology, benefits, and cancer signs 

Breast thermography: Technology, benefits, and cancer signs 

Breast thermography is a non-invasive and painless test, with no radiation involved. It can detect and monitor early warning signs of breast cancer. This type of breast cancer screening is particularly useful for people under the age of 50. This is because mammography, another type of screening, can be less effective for this group. However, thermography is not an alternative to mammography. Mammography remains the main way of screening for early signs of breast cancer and uses low doses of X-rays.

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Increase in Double Mastectomies Might Not Be Necessary

Increase in Double Mastectomies Might Not Be Necessary

Between the years 2012-2015 double mastectomies have tripled. Often women want to just get rid of the cancer, and hope the cancer never returns again. Doctors fear this kind of decision-making is not necessarily the best path. They think women are not considering the pain and recovery period, or the long-term effects of a double mastectomy.

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Creative play: Helping children cope with cancer

Creative play: Helping children cope with cancer

Rogers says creative play helps kids and teens begin identifying and expressing the feelings associated with what is going on in their lives from a “safe distance.” She notes, “Most children don’t readily respond to adults asking direct questions about how they feel, but when we engage in play, whether through toys or games or through creating art projects together, they can express themselves without having to put those feelings into words.” Art, in particular, can be very productive in helping kids express themselves. “Kids are most comfortable when they express themselves through play—and art is an extension of that play.”

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9 Easy Ways to Reduce Your Cancer Risk, Every Day

9 Easy Ways to Reduce Your Cancer Risk, Every Day

The dreaded “C” word makes us cringe – and with so many people diagnosed every day, preventing cancer can seem insurmountable. But cancers don’t develop overnight, and there are ways you can dramatically reduce your cancer risk just by tweaking daily activities like eating, drinking, and exercise.

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Breast Cancer Treatment with Vaccine

Breast Cancer Treatment with Vaccine

The new treatment doesn’t work like other vaccines you’re familiar with (think: mumps or hepatitis). It won’t prevent you from getting breast cancer, but it can help treat the disease if used during the early stages, according to a new report published in Clinical Cancer Research. Called immunotherapy, the drug works by using your own immune system to attack a specific protein attached to cancer cells. This allows your body to kill the cancer cells without killing your healthy cells along with them, which is a common occurrence in traditional chemotherapy. Plus, you get all the cancer-fighting benefits but without the nasty side effects like hair loss, mental fog, and extreme nausea.

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Mammogram Guidelines Have Changed, But Are Doctors Listening?

Mammogram Guidelines Have Changed, But Are Doctors Listening?

Four of five doctors still recommend annual mammograms for women in their early 40s, despite guideline changes that have pushed back the age for yearly breast cancer screening, a new survey shows. Mammography recommendations were changed in recent years based on evidence that breast cancer occurs so much less often in women in their 40s that the risks of screening outweigh the benefits

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Everything You Need to Know About Your Breasts Before and After Pregnancy

Everything You Need to Know About Your Breasts Before and After Pregnancy

You’ll hear all the time about lumps and how they shouldn’t occur. The truth is that some lumps in the breasts can be normal and they may be nothing to worry about. The breasts are full of glands, which tend to be lumpy. When you have hormonal changes, the glands can swell or shift position, and you may find that the lumps in your breasts are more prominent.

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Aspirin may reduce risk of death from cancer 

Aspirin may reduce risk of death from cancer 

“Evidence suggests that aspirin not only reduces the risk of developing cancer, but may also play a strong role in reducing death from cancer,” said Yin Cao, lead author of the study and an instructor in Medicine, Clinical, and Translational Epidemiology Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Overall mortality risk rates among aspirin users compared to those who did not were 11 percent (men) and 7 percent (women) lower. Mortality risk from cancer was 7 percent lower for women and 15 percent lower for men who used aspirin compared to those who did not.

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12 Non-Toxic Nail Polish Brands

12 Non-Toxic Nail Polish Brands

There are lots of brands out there that say they are all-natural or non-toxic, but there are three ingredients you are looking to avoid:
1. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) 2. Formaldehyde (yes, seriously. In your nail polish.) 3. Toluene

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New weapon against breast cancer

New weapon against breast cancer

Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and collaborators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have identified a molecular marker in normal breast tissue that can predict a woman’s risk for developing breast cancer, the leading cause of death in women with cancer worldwide.

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Don’t let sex be forbidden topic after cancer 

Don’t let sex be forbidden topic after cancer 

Our need for intimacy and closeness doesn’t stop with a cancer diagnosis. Getting the information and support you need to live life to its fullest is important. Everyone’s situation is different regarding when and how you like to receive information.

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Biomarker identified for likely aggressive, early stage breast cancer

Biomarker identified for likely aggressive, early stage breast cancer

The one-size-fits-all approach to early stage breast cancer creates a paradox: Millions of dollars are spent on unnecessary surgeries and radiation to treat women with low-risk ‘in situ’ lesions, an estimated 85% of which would never progress to invasive cancers. Meanwhile, the standard conservative treatment is insufficient for many early-stage tumors that have progressed past the in situ stage and fails to prevent their spread to distant sites in the body. Now Whitehead Institute researchers have identified SMARCE1, a gene overexpressed in the subset of early-stage cancers that are likely to become aggressively invasive – making it possible for the first time to distinguish poorly invasive tumors from those that will likely spread and metastasize. With such a biomarker, doctors could better tailor therapies designed to match the behavior of each patient’s cancer.

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Understanding and treating ER-positive breast cancer

Understanding and treating ER-positive breast cancer

The way that a doctor treats ER-positive breast cancer depends on many factors, including the stage of cancer, how much it has spread, and the source of cancer. If the cancer is ER- or PR-positive, hormone therapy will almost certainly be included in the treatment plan for the patient.

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Targeted Cancer Drug May Also Help Protect Fertility

Targeted Cancer Drug May Also Help Protect Fertility

In the mouse study, researchers from the NYU Langone Medical Center and Perlmutter Cancer Center in New York showed that the targeted agents known as mTOR inhibitors block chemotherapy-induced damage to the ovaries that causes infertility.

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Understanding Post-Treatment “Chemobrain”

Understanding Post-Treatment “Chemobrain”

Although these are all small studies, together they point to imbalances or deficits in neurotransmitter activity as risk factors for cognitive impairment after cancer treatment, a conclusion that could have a variety of treatment implications. For example, research shows that in animal models, the antidepressant fluoxetine can prevent or improve memory problems associated with the chemotherapy treatment 5-FU.

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The Truth About Progesterone and Breast Cancer

The Truth About Progesterone and Breast Cancer

Hormone receptor-positive breast cancers have many hormone receptors. When breast cancer develops, the tumor cells become overly sensitive to estrogen. When estrogen activates the estrogen receptor, it turns on a panel of genes that tell the cells to keep dividing, driving tumor growth. However, when breast cancer cells have working progesterone receptors, and there is sufficient progesterone available, progesterone will slow down estrogen fueled growth and division of these cells.

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Black Women Still Far Less Likely to Get Immediate Breast Reconstruction

Black Women Still Far Less Likely to Get Immediate Breast Reconstruction

“Since these large databases play an important role in making healthcare policy, it’s important to appreciate the significant differences in racial and socioeconomic disparities in immediate breast reconstruction,” senior author Samuel J. Lin, MD, MBA, of Harvard Medical School, and a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, said in a press release.

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Royal Rife and a ‘virus’ at the heart of every cancer?

This article covers the work of Royal Rife, a scientist who could well have been at least 80 years ahead of his time. Not only did he invent one of the most powerful microscopes ever seen, he used it to identify foreign matter, which he called a ´virus´, at the heart of every cancer. He then went on to work out the energetic frequency of each of the different ´viruses´ he found and even build a ´Rife Machine´, or colloquially a zapper, which could adjust electrofrequency and kill off that particular ´virus´ leaving healthy cells untouched. He was ridiculed, attacked and his work stopped. He died a pauper. Only now are scientists once again thinking there might be an infection contributing to every cancer, as Big Pharma contemplates the profits involved in developing a myriad of vaccines.

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Breast cancer risk slashed by Rainbow Diet

Breast cancer risk slashed by Rainbow Diet

A colourful Mediterranean Diet, or a Rainbow Diet, can reduce the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer by 40 per cent, according to research by the World Cancer Research Fund. It was particularly effective at reducing non-estrogen positive breast cancers (ER-) like Triple Negative Breast Cancer and HER2+ Breast Cancer, which have been increasing and now account for a third of all newly diagnosed breast cancers.

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Is Bisphenol S Just as Risky as Bisphenol A?

Is Bisphenol S Just as Risky as Bisphenol A?

Replacing BPA in common products allows manufacturers to claim their goods are BPA-free. It doesn’t mean that the plastics, receipts or paper currency containing replacement compounds are safe. Bisphenol S, or BPS, is one of the most widely used replacements. Testing in breast cancer cells shows, however, that BPS also mimics estrogen and is an endocrine disruptor.

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How Does Bisphenol A (BPA) Affect Breast Cancer? 

How Does Bisphenol A (BPA) Affect Breast Cancer? 

Scientists at Duke University have found that this endocrine-disrupting compound can make inflammatory breast cancer cells resist treatment. When these cancer cells are treated with bisphenol A in the laboratory, they generate more of the signaling molecules called epidermal growth factor receptors. A low dose of BPA doubled the amount of EGFR on cell surfaces. As a result of exposure to BPA, these aggressive breast cancer cells grew faster and were less likely to die when treated with common anti-cancer drugs. A response of this nature could complicate treatment of this devastating disease.

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How To Fund Your Cancer Treatment

How To Fund Your Cancer Treatment

If you have been diagnosed with cancer and decide to pursue a natural or integrative protocol, traditional insurance policies may not cover the cost of treatments. In this case, there are options to help ensure that everyday financial responsibilities do not become overwhelming.

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10 Revolutionary Life Lessons from Studying Cancer Survivors

10 Revolutionary Life Lessons from Studying Cancer Survivors

Kelly Turner studies cancer patients who have been told they had only months to live, that there was nothing more that could be done, and yet are walking around cancer-free years later. She calls these cases radical remissions — instead of spontaneous remissions, as they are more commonly referred to — because what she has learned from analyzing more than 1,000 (out of an estimated 100,000) of these cases is that there are common threads among the behaviors of the people who have radical remissions.

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Breast Cancer Aftermath: Cutting Through the Brain Fog(s)

Breast Cancer Aftermath: Cutting Through the Brain Fog(s)

Maybe it is because I am getting older? Whatever it is, more research needs to be done. It is really frustrating and embarrassing, too. But I can say this: Things have started to get better. It has been months since I had a major memory obstacle. However, I still find some trouble getting my words out. And for those who are still battling chemo brain, please know it will get better. I know it is frustrating. Hopefully, in time it will go away. But I honestly think I always will have some of it left in me.

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Preventive tools for women at high risk for breast cancer 

Preventive tools for women at high risk for breast cancer 

Some women are more prone to getting breast cancer than others. Knowing your risk may prove empowering, especially at a time when prevention efforts are growing in both importance and availability. With today’s focus on preventing cancer when possible, some medical leaders are designing programs specifically to identify high-risk women and help them avoid becoming the one in eight women who will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.

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Novel Approaches in Male Breast Cancer

Novel Approaches in Male Breast Cancer

Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare and poorly understood disease, but recent molecular studies have revealed fundamental differences from female breast cancer that could help guide treatment strategies toward a more tailored approach

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Killer: Cancer or Chemo?

Killer: Cancer or Chemo?

A recent analysis found that cancer drugs are themselves killing up to 50% of patients within thirty days, indicating that chemotherapy was the cause of death, not the cancer. Of course, chemotherapy can kill patients over the long-term as well. Chemo can shrink tumors, but it doesn’t eradicate them. It also kills healthy cells in the process. Additionally, cancer can re-emerge in patients still undergoing chemotherapy. Researchers think this is because tumors are fueled by cancer “stem cells” that are largely immune to chemo. It is also incredibly expensive for the consumer (which is key for the drug companies), costing around $10,000 a month.

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More Breast Cancer Patients Than Previously Thought Could Benefit from PARP Inhibitors

More Breast Cancer Patients Than Previously Thought Could Benefit from PARP Inhibitors

PARP inhibitors like Lynparza (olaparib) were designed to treat patients with inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, but more women with breast cancer could benefit from these drugs, a study suggests. The team found that up to 22 percent of breast cancer patients had mutations that led to a defective BRCA function — a much higher percentage than the 1 to 5 percent of women known to have BRCA mutations. While the results must be validated in future clinical trials, the findings suggest that a much larger percentage of breast cancer patients could benefit from already approved PARP inhibitors.

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Breast Cancer-related Clinical Trial Controversy Resurfaces

Breast Cancer-related Clinical Trial Controversy Resurfaces

In his article, “The evidence base for HRT: what can we believe?,” Professor Robert D. Langer argues that a small group of the study’s investigators “hijacked” the data. One of his accusations is that the group incorrectly reported that the study was cut short because of higher risks of women developing breast cancer and heart attacks from the hormonal treatment. The serious allegations against some of the investigators in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI; NCT00000611) suggest that the study reporting violated guidelines on how trial data should be presented.

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Cancer Linked to Gut Health

Cancer Linked to Gut Health

Until 2014 scientists had no reason to believe that bacteria might play any role at all in breast cancer. But then a Canadian, Dr. Gregor Reid, a scientist at Lawson Health Research Institute, felt that this since mothers impart bacteria to their children from breast milk, and the longer a mother breast feeds the more protection she gives herself, maybe there were bacterial factors at work in breast cancer. Sure enough, Dr. Reid and his doctoral student Camilla Urbaniak from Western University, Ontario, Canada, showed that your breasts do have their own set of live bacteria – their own microbiome.

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How to Find Support for Advanced Breast Cancer

How to Find Support for Advanced Breast Cancer

Advanced breast cancer, also called stage 4 breast cancer, can be challenging to live with. In addition to enduring the physical toll of cancer and its treatment, you might also experience emotional highs and lows. Treatment can slow the cancer’s progression for months or years, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), which means you may need support over a long period of time. But it’s important to know that you don’t have to go it alone. There are many resources and sources of support available to help you better manage advanced breast cancer. Here’s how to find the emotional and practical support you need for your journey.

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Afinitor May Keep Breast Cancer Patients on Chemo Fertile

Afinitor May Keep Breast Cancer Patients on Chemo Fertile

A major concern for premenopausal women who have chemotherapy is infertility. That’s because the treatment can damage the ovaries and reduce the supply of ovarian follicles, precursors of egg cells that are needed for future pregnancies. “Our results argue that everolimus may represent a fertility-sparing drug treatment to complement the freezing of eggs and embryos, which are valued methods, but time-consuming, costly, less effective with age, and not protective of long-term ovarian function,” Goldman said.

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Are Hazardous Waste Sites to Blame for Cancer Hot Spots?

Are Hazardous Waste Sites to Blame for Cancer Hot Spots?

“Our goal was to determine if there were differences or associations regarding cancer incidence in counties that contain Superfund sites compared to counties that do not,” said Dr. Emily Leary, study co-author, in a press release. “We found the rate of cancer incidence increased by more than 6 percent in counties with Superfund sites.”

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Aggressive Breast Cancer Therapy Shows Promise in Clinical Trial

Aggressive Breast Cancer Therapy Shows Promise in Clinical Trial

Thirty percent of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) responded to the experimental therapy sacituzumab govitecan after failing to respond to other treatments, according to Phase 2 trial results. Other measures of its effectiveness included the length of time patients responded to treatment, overall patient survival rate, and time to progression. The therapy was also well-tolerated, the team added.

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Early State Breast Cancer Therapy Decapeptyl Wins British Approval

Early State Breast Cancer Therapy Decapeptyl Wins British Approval

Britain has approved Ipsen Pharmaceuticals’ Decapeptyl (triptorelin) in combination with tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor to treat pre-menopausal, early stage breast cancer patients. St Gallen, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) updated their early stage breast cancer treatment guidelines. The new guidelines include a recommendation that an ovarian function suppressor be used in combination with tamoxifen or Aromasin to treat these patients.

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Blood test detects cancer and pinpoints location…before symptoms appear

Blood test detects cancer and pinpoints location…before symptoms appear

The test, called CancerLocator, has been developed by the University of California, and works by hunting for the DNA from tumours which circulates in the blood of cancer patients.
The team discovered that tumours which arise in different parts of the body hold a distinctive ‘footprint’ which a computer can spot.

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