Breast Cancer News

The newsletter provides a selection of recent articles in the media related to breast cancer. Subscribe on the right to have the weekly roundup emailed to you.

Scientists Find a New Way to Fight Cancer 

Scientists Find a New Way to Fight Cancer 

Justine Alford, from Cancer Research UK, says that “this new research suggests there could be a better way to kill cancer cells which, as an added bonus, also activates the immune system. Now scientists need to investigate this idea further and, if further studies confirm it is effective, develop ways to trigger this particular route of cell death in humans.”

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Christmas Holidays and the Breast Cancer Patient

Christmas Holidays and the Breast Cancer Patient

There are so many things that you can do to make the holidays so memorable if you just think about what you would like. Christmas is never about the money but rather a time when we can give of ourselves in ways that are not available to us at other time of the year. You might want to wrap up an “I owe you” for trips to doctors’ appointments or other treatments or for some babysitting duties or grocery shopping. Perhaps you might be able to take your friend’s children to soccer practice or dance lessons. Or maybe you just might curl up next to her on a chilly afternoon and watch a movie together.

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Two-stage approach improves outcomes for women with large breasts undergoing risk-reducing mastectomy

Two-stage approach improves outcomes for women with large breasts undergoing risk-reducing mastectomy

For women undergoing risk-reducing mastectomy to prevent breast cancer, reconstruction can be challenging in those with larger breasts. A two-stage approach — with initial breast reduction and “pre-shaping” followed by mastectomy and reconstruction — appears to be a safer procedure with better cosmetic results, reports the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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What Is Breast Cancer-Related Chemo-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy?

What Is Breast Cancer-Related Chemo-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy?

The American Cancer Society reports “so far, there’s no sure way to prevent CIPN. But this is a major problem for some people, and doctors are looking for medicines that work.” Nevertheless, there are some ways for your doctor to help lower the risk of CIPN such as breaking a single, large dose of chemotherapy drugs into two or three smaller doses given over the course of a week. Slowing the rate of infusion from one hour to six hours or even extending the infusion over the course of a few days may also help.

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Some Great Alternatives to Toxic Cleaning Products 

Some Great Alternatives to Toxic Cleaning Products 

Safe ingredients such as soap, water, baking soda, vinegar, lemon juice and borax, aided by a little elbow grease and a coarse sponge for scrubbing, can take care of most household cleaning needs. To add to this, they can save you a lot of money. However, when you need the added power of commercial cleaners, or for the basics such as laundry and dishwashing detergents, here are some guidelines to help you choose the products with the smallest impact on your health and the environment.

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Soy Safe, Even Protective, for Breast Cancer Survivors

Soy Safe, Even Protective, for Breast Cancer Survivors

The pros and cons of soy for breast cancer patients have been debated for years. Now, research involving more than 6,200 breast cancer survivors finds that those who ate the most soy had a lower risk of death from all causes during the nearly 10-year follow-up period. Just make sure the soy you eat is organic, since most soy contains GMOs

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Procter & Gamble Raises the Bar on Fragrance Ingredient Transparency 

Procter & Gamble Raises the Bar on Fragrance Ingredient Transparency 

Procter & Gamble, the world’s biggest maker of both household cleaning and personal care products, announced Wednesday the most sweeping fragrance ingredient transparency initiative to date, said EWG President Ken Cook. By 2019, the Cincinnati-based company will begin online disclosure of fragrance ingredients – down to 0.01 percent of the product – for all its products and lines sold in the U.S. and Canada, according to the company’s news release. Procter & Gamble will first offer consumers details about the fragrance ingredients for Tide purclean laundry detergents, Herbal Essences shampoos, Febreze air fresheners and Olay skin care products.

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Belly fat protein may cause cancer

Belly fat protein may cause cancer

Fat from both mice and humans can make a non-tumorigenic cell malignantly transform into a tumorigenic cell,” says Prof. Bernard. Referring to excess weight as a risk factor for cancer, Prof. Bernard says, “Our study suggests that body mass index, or BMI, may not be the best indicator.” “It’s abdominal obesity, and even more specifically, levels of a protein called fibroblast growth factor-2 that may be a better indicator of the risk of cells becoming cancerous.”

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Do Smart Meters Increase Cancer Risk?

Do Smart Meters Increase Cancer Risk?

RF radiation is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), as “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” This is based on the finding of a possible link in at least one study between cell phone use and a specific type of brain tumor. Because RF radiation is a possible carcinogen, and smart meters give off RF radiation, it is possible that smart meters could increase cancer risk. Still, it isn’t clear what risk, if any there might be from living in a home with a smart meter.

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The Republican tax bill will end cancer treatment for Medicare patients

The Republican tax bill will end cancer treatment for Medicare patients

The Community Oncology Alliance (COA) is warning Congress that a new, increased sequester cut to Medicare payments will severely threaten community cancer providers and the nation’s cancer care delivery system. The Medicare sequester cut has already dealt a severe blow to community cancer care, and doubling and extending it will be catastrophic. This budget gimmick will further reduce access to cancer care for Medicare patients, particularly in rural communities, limit provider choice, and have the unintended consequence of actually increasing the federal deficit.

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Stem Cells Deliver Chemo to Metastatic Breast Cancer

Stem Cells Deliver Chemo to Metastatic Breast Cancer

Researchers have used modified stem cells to deliver a cancer drug selectively to metastatic breast cancer tumors in mice. The stem cells specifically targeted metastatic tumors by homing in on the stiff environment that typically surrounds them.

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Breast MRI: What you need to know

Breast MRI: What you need to know

A breast MRI is predominately used to determine the stage of cancer by measuring the size and extent of cancerous tissues after breast cancer has been diagnosed. Because they do not use ionizing radiation, MRI scans are also commonly used to evaluate breast tissues in women who should not be exposed to radiation.

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Heart Attack, Stroke Risk Elevated Following Cancer Diagnosis

Heart Attack, Stroke Risk Elevated Following Cancer Diagnosis

A diagnosis of cancer can come with an increased risk of a heart attack or stroke in the months following the diagnosis, findings from a new study suggest. Within 6 months of a cancer diagnosis, in fact, the risk of having either event was more than twice that seen in people without cancer.

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This is how belly fat could increase your cancer risk

This is how belly fat could increase your cancer risk

A Michigan State University study offers new details showing that a certain protein released from fat in the body can cause a non-cancerous cell to turn into a cancerous one. The federally funded research also found that a lower layer of abdominal fat, when compared to fat just under the skin, is the more likely culprit, releasing even more of this protein and encouraging tumor growth.

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Study: Nearly half of cancer patients can’t answer basic questions about their disease

Study: Nearly half of cancer patients can’t answer basic questions about their disease

“It has been well documented that patients with advanced cancer are more likely to choose aggressive end-of-life care when they have a poor understanding of their illness,” said the study, which was published recently in the American Society of Clinical Oncology. “This raises significant concerns regarding the informed consent process and our ability to provide care that truly aligns with patient preferences and goals of care.”

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What NOT to Say to Someone Having Breast Reconstruction Surgery

What NOT to Say to Someone Having Breast Reconstruction Surgery

There are many who believe breast reconstruction is simply a free cosmetic breast surgery. This could not be further from the truth. Breast Reconstruction is performed after a woman has undergone removal of her breast tissue for medical reasons. That’s a completely different scenario to women choosing to enhance the appearance of their existing, natural breasts. Furthermore, insurance is required to cover breast reconstruction, but this does not mean the surgery is free. Insurance policies come with ongoing costs to maintain, and also an assigned deductible and out of pocket amount that must be paid by the patient. In addition, many women must travel to find surgeons who are experienced in advanced breast reconstruction techniques like the DIEP flap.

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The Vitamin That Targets And Kills Cancer Stem Cells

The Vitamin That Targets And Kills Cancer Stem Cells

The study, published in the medical journal Oncotarget, found that vitamin C can actually seek out and destroy cancer stem cells, thereby preventing the spread of the disease. Vitamin C was found by researchers to be up to 10 times more effective at killing cancer stem cells than experimental drugs. That’s good news considering the toll that cancer is currently taking. Cancer is currently the second leading cause of death and killed almost 9 million people in 2015 alone.

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Fat rats show why breast cancer may be more aggressive in patients with obesity

Fat rats show why breast cancer may be more aggressive in patients with obesity

About 40 percent of American women have obesity; about 75 percent of breast cancers are estrogen-receptor positive, most of which will go on to be treated with anti-estrogen therapies. This combination means that thousands of women every year could benefit from treatments aimed at the aspects of obesity that promote breast cancer in low- or non-estrogen environments.

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Unrecognized Effect of Chemotherapy Uncovered

Unrecognized Effect of Chemotherapy Uncovered

A new study conducted primarily in mice suggests that chemotherapy given before surgery for breast cancer can cause changes in cells in and around the tumor that are tied to an increased risk of the cancer spreading to other areas of the body. However, the study also identifies an experimental therapy that could potentially reduce this risk.

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Look Out For These Reactive Metals In Your Cookware 

Look Out For These Reactive Metals In Your Cookware 

Steer clear of non-stick cookware (with the exception of cookware that uses only ceramics to avoid sticking), as it is known to contain toxic chemicals. If you want to avoid metals leaching into your foods altogether, stick with stainless steel or ceramic cookware.

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Chemo Will Try to Kill Your Sex Life

Chemo Will Try to Kill Your Sex Life

Unfortunately, the majority of people who are diagnosed with cancer report some change in sexual function, because of either cancer or cancer treatment,” says Sharon Bober, founder and director of the Sexual Health Program for Cancer Patients and Survivors at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Bober explains that treatment’s impact on sexuality and sexual function is broad; the side effects are myriad.

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Cancer Doctor Studies ‘Financial Toxicity’ To Help Patients Struggling With Debt

Cancer Doctor Studies ‘Financial Toxicity’ To Help Patients Struggling With Debt

Ten years ago, Fumiko Chino was the art director at a television production company in Houston, engaged to be married to a young Ph.D. candidate. Today, she’s a radiation oncologist at Duke University, studying the effects of financial strain on cancer patients. And she’s a widow. How she got from there to here is a story about how health care and money are intertwined in ways that doctors and patients don’t like to talk about. Chino is co-author of a research letter, published in JAMA Oncology, that shows that some cancer patients, even with insurance, spend about a third of their household income on out-of-pocket health care costs outside of insurance premiums.

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Understanding The Myths About Breast Cancer 

Understanding The Myths About Breast Cancer 

While I have learned so much along the way about all of the myths connected to breast cancer, I do think that we must always put things into proper perspectives. Until such times as the scientific community is able to figure out how and why we get cancer, perhaps we should focus on dealing with our own individual treatment and healing. While we are given certain guidelines to hopefully improve our chances of not getting cancer, we all know people who have religiously lived by those guidelines and still got cancer. Therefore, since we can’t change the past, we do ourselves a major favor if we choose to focus on our present and the future.

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Before Buying a Water Filter, Read This

Before Buying a Water Filter, Read This

The findings of the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) Tap Water Database may be shocking to many Americans, as they show that the drinking water supplies of nearly everyone in the nation are tainted with chemicals at levels exceeding at least one health-protective guideline. If you’re concerned about what’s in your water, buying a water filter is a smart next step. In conjunction with the database, EWG has released an updated Water Filter Buying Guide.

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Why Mammography Screening is being Abolished in Switzerland 

Why Mammography Screening is being Abolished in Switzerland 

Last year, the Swiss Medical Board, an independent health technology assessment initiative, was asked to prepare a review of mammography screening. The team of experts on the board included a medical ethicist, a clinical epidemiologist, a pharmacologist, an oncologic surgeon, a nurse scientist, a lawyer, and a health economist. After a year of reviewing the available evidence and its implications, they noted they became “increasingly concerned” about what they were finding. The “evidence” simply did not back up the global consensus of other experts in the field suggesting that mammograms were safe and capable of saving lives. On the contrary, mammography appeared to be preventing only one death for every 1,000 women screened, while causing harm to many more. Their thorough review left them no choice but to recommend that no new systematic mammography screening programs be introduced, and that a time limit should be placed on existing programs. In their report, the Swiss Medical Board also advised that the quality of mammography screening should be evaluated and women should be informed, in a “clear and balanced” way, about the benefits and harms of screening. The report caused an uproar among the Swiss medical community, but it echoes growing sentiments around the globe that mammography for breast cancer screening in asymptomatic populations no longer makes sense.

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Insured, But Still Barred From Top-Tier Cancer Centers

Insured, But Still Barred From Top-Tier Cancer Centers

Choosing a cheaper health plan could cost you access to cream-of-the-crop cancer doctors and facilities, a new study reports. Less-expensive “narrow network” health plans are much less likely to cover treatment by doctors at centers affiliated with the U.S. National Cancer Institute, said study lead author Laura Yasaitis.

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Treatment Costs Can Be Another Blow to Cancer Patients 

Treatment Costs Can Be Another Blow to Cancer Patients 

The emotional and physical costs of cancer can be staggering. But the financial side of cancer is also a great burden, with many patients in the United States struggling to pay for treatment, new research reveals.
“The current health law has greatly improved access to meaningful health coverage for cancer patients, survivors and all those with chronic diseases,” Chris Hansen, president of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, said in a network news release. “Yet costs remain a challenge for those facing cancer. Our country and our lawmakers should come together to find bipartisan solutions that begin to address patient costs without sacrificing the quality of coverage,” he urged.

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‘Partial radiotherapy better for breast cancer patients’

‘Partial radiotherapy better for breast cancer patients’

The findings of the IMPORT LOW trial, published in the journal The Lancet, showed that women who received partial radiotherapy reported fewer long-term changes to the appearance and feel of their breast than those who had radiotherapy to the whole breast. Further, five years after treatment, almost all patients were disease-free, the researchers said.

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New test could predict whether breast cancer will return 

New test could predict whether breast cancer will return 

People who are diagnosed with oestrogen-sensitive breast cancer – which accounts for around 80 per cent of breast cancers, the most common cancer in women – respond well to treatment. But some patients are at particular risk of dying when it returns, especially after about five years. The new research helps identify people who belong to that sub-group, in a move towards avoiding those relapses. It also means that those who aren’t part of those groups may be able to avoid chemotherapy.

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How not to say the wrong thing

How not to say the wrong thing

Here is a simple technique to help people avoid saying the wrong thing. It works for all kinds of crises: medical, legal, financial, romantic, even existential. It’s called the Ring Theory.

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Top 10 Toxic Chemicals Used in Makeup

Top 10 Toxic Chemicals Used in Makeup

Many beauty and skin care products on the market are full of hidden chemicals, and makeup products may be the worst. If you want to be healthy and still use foundation and eyeliner, you may be wondering: Is it possible to wear makeup without harming your body with toxic chemicals? Yes, just like you can swap out harsh cleaning products and get rid of toxic food, you can change out your makeup.

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FDA Clears Wider Use of Cooling Cap

FDA Clears Wider Use of Cooling Cap

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared a cooling cap—a device designed to reduce hair loss during chemotherapy—for use by patients with any kind of solid tumor. FDA initially cleared the device, the DigniCap® Scalp Cooling System, for patients with breast cancer in 2015.

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3 Simple Ways to Tell GMO From Organic Foods

3 Simple Ways to Tell GMO From Organic Foods

Organic products are marked ‘100% Organic’, ‘Organic’, or ‘Made with Organic Ingredients’. Look out for labels that are marked ‘GMO-free’, ‘Non-GMO’, or ‘Made without Genetically Modified Ingredients’. These products may contain GMO but no more than 0.9%. In the USA, fruit and vegetables are marked with a PLU-code of 5 numbers on a label. The code on GM products starts with an 8.

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Should I Join a Breast Cancer Support Group? 

Should I Join a Breast Cancer Support Group? 

Disease-specific support groups have been around a long time and can be helpful for connecting you with other patients dealing with the same or similar issues and side effects. Finding other people who can relate to your present situation can be helpful for maintaining a more positive frame of mind when coping with a cancer diagnosis and treatment.

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100 Cancer-Causing Contaminants Found in US Drinking Water

100 Cancer-Causing Contaminants Found in US Drinking Water

he Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) just-released Tap Water Database shows that a startling number of cancer-causing chemicals contaminate the nation’s drinking water. Of 250 different contaminants detected in tests by local utilities, 93 are linked to an increased risk of developing cancer.

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Breast Cancer Study Questions Control Group Therapies in Many Trials

Breast Cancer Study Questions Control Group Therapies in Many Trials

Many breast cancer clinical trials that are described as comparing a new treatment with a standard-of-care therapy do not actually make such a comparison, University of Sydney researchers argue. That’s because they fail to follow U.S. or European clinical practice guidelines on control treatments, the team contended. The risk of doing this is generating a biased assessment of a new drug, they said.

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Relationships and metastatic breast cancer

Relationships and metastatic breast cancer

Acknowledge that relationships may change during this time. Give yourself and your loved ones time to adjust. But stay connected by sharing your thoughts, hopes and worries with those you love. It can help all of you cope with your cancer and bring you closer together.

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Cancer survivors: Late effects of cancer treatment 

Cancer survivors: Late effects of cancer treatment 

Late effects of cancer treatment can come from any of the main types of cancer treatment: chemotherapy, hormone therapy, radiation, surgery, targeted therapy and immunotherapy. As newer types of cancer treatment are developed, such as immunotherapy, doctors may find that these treatments also cause late effects in cancer survivors.

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Tai Chi Helps Breast Cancer Survivors Beat Insomnia, Depression

Tai Chi Helps Breast Cancer Survivors Beat Insomnia, Depression

For the study, researchers recruited 90 breast cancer survivors, ranging in age from 42 to 83, who had insomnia three or more times a week, and who also suffered with depression and drowsiness in the daytime. Each volunteer was randomly assigned to weekly CBT or weekly tai chi instruction, for three months. The participants were evaluated at intervals for the next year to track their insomnia symptoms, as well as their symptoms of fatigue and depression, and to determine whether there was any improvement. Fifteen months into the study, 46.7% of those in the tai chi group, and 43.7% of those in the CBT group continued to show robust, clinically significant improvement in their insomnia symptoms.

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The 10 best breast cancer blogs

The 10 best breast cancer blogs

Breast cancer can have an impact on many aspects of your daily life. Everyone copes with their diagnosis differently, but breast cancer blogs can provide you with the latest breast cancer breakthroughs, educational information, and support. We have found the best breast cancer blogs.

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New breast cancer stem cell findings explain how cancer spreads 

New breast cancer stem cell findings explain how cancer spreads 

“The lethal part of cancer is its metastasis so understanding how metastasis occurs is critical,” says senior study author Max S. Wicha, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Oncology and director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. “We have evidence that cancer stem cells are responsible for metastasis — they are the seeds that mediate cancer’s spread. Now we’ve discovered how the stem cells do this.”

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Scary Dairy: You Scream, I Scream… Monsanto Roundup Ice Cream

Scary Dairy: You Scream, I Scream… Monsanto Roundup Ice Cream

Ten out of 11 samples of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream tested positive for glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, the nonprofit Organic Consumers Association revealed on Tuesday. This has raised concerns among environmentalists and food safety advocates alike, because glyphosate has been linked hormone disruption, and there is a contentious debate over whether it causes cancer. Last month, California made headlines, and was lauded by environmentalists, when it voted to add glyphosate to its list of cancer-causing chemicals, as Common Dreams reported. In 2015, the World Health Organization designated the chemical a “probable human carcinogen.”

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‘Nipple-Sparing’ Mastectomies Don’t Raise Odds of Cancer’s Return

‘Nipple-Sparing’ Mastectomies Don’t Raise Odds of Cancer’s Return

In the new study, Smith’s team tracked outcomes for 297 women who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy from June 2007 through 2012. Fourteen had cancer in both breasts and underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy on both sides, so the total number of surgeries was 311. After a median follow-up of more than four years, there was a 5.5 percent breast cancer recurrence rate. None of the recurrences involved nipples retained during mastectomies, the findings showed.

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Should I Join a Breast Cancer Support Group?

Should I Join a Breast Cancer Support Group?

Disease-specific support groups have been around a long time and can be helpful for connecting you with other patients dealing with the same or similar issues and side effects. Finding other people who can relate to your present situation can be helpful for maintaining a more positive frame of mind when coping with a cancer diagnosis and treatment.

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5 Ways You Are Avoiding Intimacy After Cancer 

5 Ways You Are Avoiding Intimacy After Cancer 

Reintroduce intimacy into your relationship, and then the sex will come. Communicate and set boundaries. Tell your partner exactly what you want. If you want to cuddle and make out like teenagers, great! Make sure to let him know that, so he does not have expectations of sex. Let your partner know you want to, but you are not ready. Take those baby steps and allow your mind and body a chance to reconnect.

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What Happens When a Breast Cancer Clinical Trial Ends

What Happens When a Breast Cancer Clinical Trial Ends

For those considering participating in a breast cancer clinical trial, it is important to understand what happens after the participant is no longer in the study. The study can end for some people before its planned duration is reached, or before the study’s endpoint is determined. Some participants may also be want to continue with a treatment after the study is over. All of these issues are important to review with study coordinators before beginning a clinical trial. The Informed Consent Document also provides information about leaving a study or what to expect after the study is over.

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It’s Time to Move Beyond Breast Cancer Awareness to Ending it for Everyone. 

It’s Time to Move Beyond Breast Cancer Awareness to Ending it for Everyone. 

As October comes to a close, we can begin to say goodbye to a world awash in pink! We have been made aware of the risks for breast cancer. We’ve heard about ways to diagnose it that might be better than mammograms, and read about “groundbreaking” and “game changing” new treatments. This “pink cloud” often masks not only the realities of a breast cancer diagnosis but also how limited our research has been. Most breast cancer research is still done on laboratory rats and mice. And when we do study women, we still do not enroll significant numbers of women of color!

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FDA Clears Wider Use of Cooling Cap

FDA Clears Wider Use of Cooling Cap

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared a cooling cap—a device designed to reduce hair loss during chemotherapy—for use by patients with any kind of solid tumor. FDA initially cleared the device, the DigniCap® Scalp Cooling System, for patients with breast cancer in 2015.

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Canadian Study Gives More Evidence Cancer Is A Lifestyle Disease Largely Caused By Food

Canadian Study Gives More Evidence Cancer Is A Lifestyle Disease Largely Caused By Food

Shockingly, worldwide cancer rates are predicted to rise even further, and that by the year 2020, 1-in-2 women and 1-in-3 men will be diagnosed with some form of cancer. It is so common already, in fact, that it getting cancer is more common than getting married or having a first baby. The cancer industrial complex is negligent in warning people who chemotherapy is now known to actually make some cancers spread and make some tumors more aggressive. Government and its myriad regulatory agencies work diligently to prevent access to natural or alternative cancer treatments, and doctors and the mainstream media give the impression that the causes of cancer are a mystery. In reality, one can significantly reduce the likelihood of getting cancer by making lifestyle changes, and according to a recently published study out of Canada found that the total proportion of cancer rates which can be attributed to lifestyle and environmental factors is quite high, nearing 41%.

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Why cancer is not a war, fight, or battle 

Why cancer is not a war, fight, or battle 

Writers before me like Susan Sontag and Barbara Ehrenreich lived with breast cancer (and Sontag died from it), and both wrote about the dissonance of war metaphors in describing our disease. In war, we are taught, there are winners and losers. When breast cancer, a disease for which there is no known cure, progresses to our lymph nodes and shuts down our organs, have we as fighters failed?

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Putting a Knot in Pinkwashing

Putting a Knot in Pinkwashing

It takes more than a pink ribbon to show a company really cares about women living with and at risk of breast cancer. Instead of taking steps to clean up their products and manufacturing process as part of their work to “create a breast cancer-free world,” Estée Lauder is congratulating themselves on distributing more than 150 million pink ribbons at their beauty counters and illuminating more than 1,000 landmarks around the world pink “to raise awareness.” They even hold the Guinness World Record for “Most Landmarks Illuminated for a Cause in 24 Hours.” But in our book, the only record they hold is longest running empty awareness campaign.

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Bisphosphonates Not Linked to Reduction in Breast Cancer Risk 

Bisphosphonates Not Linked to Reduction in Breast Cancer Risk 

Bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. “Preclinical studies have suggested that bisphosphonates could also exert some antitumor activity through an effect on tumor apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, or angiogenesis, which makes bisphosphonates an attractive class of drugs to be studied further for cancer prevention,” wrote study authors led by Agnès Fournier, PhD, of Université Paris-Sud in Paris. However, a large observational study of postmenopausal women found that bisphosphonate use, mostly oral, and likely prescribed for the management of osteoporosis, was not associated with decreased breast cancer risk. The authors concluded. “Our results therefore do not support the hypothesis that bisphosphonates could be effective for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women.”

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The 6 Worst Ingredients In Household Cleaning Products

The 6 Worst Ingredients In Household Cleaning Products

You may be experiencing more than a clean home when you use many commercial cleaning products. That’s because there are countless harmful ingredients that should not be used. Here is a summary of some of the worst ingredients along with superior natural options.

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FDA approves new treatment to reduce the risk of breast cancer returning

FDA approves new treatment to reduce the risk of breast cancer returning

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Nerlynx (neratinib) for the extended adjuvant treatment of early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. For patients with this type of cancer, Nerlynx is the first extended adjuvant therapy, a form of therapy that is taken after an initial treatment to further lower the risk of the cancer coming back. Nerlynx is indicated for adult patients who have been previously treated with a regimen that includes the drug trastuzumab.

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Global study reveals 72 gene mutations that lead to breast cancer 

Global study reveals 72 gene mutations that lead to breast cancer 

Researchers from 300 institutions around the world combined forces to discover 72 previously unknown gene mutations that lead to the development of breast cancer. Two studies describing their work published Monday in the journals Nature and Nature Genetics. The teams found that 65 of the newly identified genetic variants are common among women with breast cancer. The remaining seven mutations predispose women to developing a type of breast cancer known as estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer, which doesn’t respond to hormonal therapies, such as the drug tamoxifen. The new discoveries add to previous research bringing the total number of known variants associated with breast cancer to nearly 180.

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Why Are So Many American Women Having Mastectomies?

Why Are So Many American Women Having Mastectomies?

When Angelina Jolie publicly announced her double mastectomy four years ago, she was praised for possibly saving many women’s lives. But we know more today than we did then and experts now agree that too many women are undergoing unnecessary mastectomies – even some women with the “breast cancer genes.” You’ll be surprised by what we’ve learned.

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The White House’s Pathetic Breast-Cancer Pinkwashing

The White House’s Pathetic Breast-Cancer Pinkwashing

On the first of October, the White House was lit up pink in honor of breast-cancer awareness. President Trump even released a statement pledging to “stand strong for those facing a breast cancer diagnosis.” Since then, the White House has not made another peep about breast cancer. Instead, the president has used the month to make several moves that, more than anything, show breast-cancer patients how little Trump cares for them. Or even thinks about them at all. He’s attacked an Affordable Care Act provision that makes insurance policies more affordable to low-income people, targeted environmental regulations, and singled out women’s health. And the month’s only half over.

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The Top Killer In Breast Cancer May Surprise You

The Top Killer In Breast Cancer May Surprise You

The leading cause of death in breast cancer patients today is heart disease. Women in their 40s and 50s are experiencing heart failure and other cardiotoxicities after treatment with radiation, anthracyclines and HER2 receptor antagonists, noted Sandra Cuellar, PharmD, BCOP, at the 13th Annual Conference of the Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association.

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How Routine Mammography Screening Leads to Overdiagnosis & Overtreatment

How Routine Mammography Screening Leads to Overdiagnosis & Overtreatment

After more than 30 years of widespread promotion of routine breast cancer screening for women at average risk, an undeniable body of research shows the significant harms and limited benefits of population-based screening. The truth is that widespread mammography screening has failed to dramatically reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer. Last week, a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine added to the compelling evidence that for a majority of asymptomatic women at average risk of breast cancer, the harms of screening may outweigh the benefit.

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Eight Positive Things About My Breast Cancer Diagnosis 

Eight Positive Things About My Breast Cancer Diagnosis 

There are no pros and cons to this situation, it’s just shit. Period. People often say, “Well, you could walk out of your front door and get knocked down by a bus!” Guess what, being diagnosed with cancer makes you feel exactly like that! Nevertheless, one can’t help but become philosophical when faced with this kind of adversity. I’ve even gained the prestigious nickname ‘the voice of reason’, and as a result I’ve managed to find eight positive outcomes from having breast cancer. Unbelievable, I know, yet true.

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Toxic Industrial Chemicals Found in 10 Types of Macaroni and Cheese Powders

Toxic Industrial Chemicals Found in 10 Types of Macaroni and Cheese Powders

Based on the risks that phthalates pose to women and children, many of these chemicals have been banned for use in children’s toys and childcare articles by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. But that’s little protection for pregnant women. Europe has already prohibited all phthalates from use in plastic food contact materials for fatty foods, including dairy products, except for three phthalates whose use has been highly restricted. In contrast, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has failed to take action in response to growing concern and scientific consensus.

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Oncologists across U.S. to alter how they stage breast cancer this winter

Oncologists across U.S. to alter how they stage breast cancer this winter

Doctors have been using the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM system when diagnosing breast cancer. It was based on the size of the tumor, where the cancer had reached nearby lymph nodes and whether the cancer had metastasized (or spread). In that system, there are typically four stages of breast cancer, with the first stage meaning the cancer is contained in the breast and the fourth stage signifying that the cancer has spread to multiple other parts of the body. Stage IV breast cancer has been considered difficult to cure. The new staging system will now add a fourth factor to the TNM system: Genomic testing, which will look at the DNA of the tumor.

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Is Our Clothing Toxic? It’s More Complicated Than We Think 

Is Our Clothing Toxic? It’s More Complicated Than We Think 

It’s complicated. Your clothing is never made solely out of just cotton or polyester. Every single fabric has some form of processing. It may be preshunk cotton, or superwash merino. It may be bleached. It’s almost always dyed. And nowadays clothing comes in all kinds of high-tech variations: UV protective, bug repellant, wrinkle-free, stain resistant, antimicrobial, and so on. Even pure cotton can be grown with pesticides.

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Cancer Radiation Therapy Linked to Future Cancer Risk, Heart Problems

Cancer Radiation Therapy Linked to Future Cancer Risk, Heart Problems

The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has confirmed the risks of radiation therapy to treat cancer. In a report, the council noted that as the number of cancer survivors tripled in the last 40 years, more survivors have developed heart problems or a new, different cancer likely related to radiation exposure during treatment for the first cancer.

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Chemotherapy before breast cancer surgery might fuel metastasis

Chemotherapy before breast cancer surgery might fuel metastasis

The main goal of pre-operative (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy for breast cancer is to shrink tumors so women can have a lumpectomy rather than a more invasive mastectomy. It was therefore initially used only on large tumors after being introduced about 25 years ago. But as fewer and fewer women were diagnosed with large breast tumors, pre-op chemo began to be used in patients with smaller cancers, too, in the hope that it would extend survival. But pre-op chemo can, instead, promote metastasis, scientists concluded from experiments in lab mice and human tissue, published in Science Translational Medicine

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A simple breath test could be the next step in diagnosing breast cancer

A simple breath test could be the next step in diagnosing breast cancer

The USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center is recruiting people for a clinical trial that will research the effectiveness of a breath test for breast cancer diagnostics. The BreathLink device captures a two-minute sample of a patient’s breath and provides prompt results on whether there are indications of breast cancer. If proven effective, the test would be used with mammograms to rule out false-positive tests, sparing patients the pain, cost and anxiety of unnecessary biopsies.

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Treatment options for metastatic breast cancer 

Treatment options for metastatic breast cancer 

Once a cancer has spread to other parts of the body in metastatic cancer, it’s extremely difficult to completely get rid of all the cancer cells. That means metastatic breast cancer is usually not curable. But it is treatable. In recent years, there have been significant advances that have prolonged the lives of people with metastatic breast cancer, thanks to more effective therapies. The goals and aggressiveness of your treatment options will depend on your individual situation and preferences. Understanding what you want out of your treatment can help guide your treatment decisions.

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I’m A Survivor, But Breast Cancer Awareness Month Stresses Me Out

I’m A Survivor, But Breast Cancer Awareness Month Stresses Me Out

I’m thankful for pioneers like Betty Rollin and Betty Ford who took breast cancer out of the shadows and into the light of day. It needed to happen. But every year I’m more uncomfortable with all the hoopla surrounding this month. At times it feels like a garish form of entertainment focusing on breasts, “boobies,” “ta-tas,” “the twins,” and “the girls,” all on display and begging to be saved.

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus shares her breast cancer diagnosis with a heartfelt call to action.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus shares her breast cancer diagnosis with a heartfelt call to action.

In her call to action, Louis-Dreyfus sounds optimistic, urging her followers to keep fighting so that others have access to the same care she’ll be able to receive. While recent efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act have fallen flat, we are far from having “universal health care.” 11% of women ages 19 to 64 in the U.S. don’t have any form of health insurance. While that number has fallen since the ACA’s implementation, it still means that millions of women are unable to access preventive care. Thanks to a number of health centers around the country, such as Planned Parenthood, low-income and uninsured women aren’t left completely out in the cold. Unfortunately, these groups are frequently under attack from political opponents.

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What’s the Connection Between Heart Disease and Breast Cancer?

What’s the Connection Between Heart Disease and Breast Cancer?

The National Cancer Institute reports that the average five-year survival rate for breast cancer is now about 90 percent, thanks to advanced treatment protocols. However, some patients who’ve had radiation treatment and chemotherapy may be at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease in what’s called a late side effect of treatment for breast cancer. This means that the heart problem may not surface for months or years after the conclusion of treatment. According to a report in the journal EJC Supplements, an open access companion journal to the European Journal of Cancer, cardiovascular disease is already the leading cause of death “accounting for 30 to 50 percent of all deaths in most developed countries. Because of this high background rate, even a minor increase in risk of CVD [resulting from cancer treatment] will have an important impact on morbidity and mortality.”

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Palliative care: Who is it for?

Palliative care: Who is it for?

Palliative care is often confused with hospice care, which is generally for people with terminal illnesses. Hospice care workers provide palliative care, but palliative care can be given at any time during an illness, not just at the end of life. Recent data show that for people with certain types of cancer, early use of palliative care services not only makes them feel better but also helps them live longer when compared with people who get standard treatment only.

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Study Affirms Cancer Risk for Women with BRCA Mutations

Study Affirms Cancer Risk for Women with BRCA Mutations

The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes code for proteins that are critical for cells to repair damaged DNA. Specific inherited mutations in these genes increase the risk of several cancer types, particularly breast and ovarian cancer. The study affirmed earlier estimates of a substantial increased lifetime risk of these cancers in carriers of inherited mutations. But it also showed that the magnitude of risk is influenced as well by the location of the mutations within the BRCA genes and the extent of the family history of breast cancer.

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Exercise Boosts Cognition, Helps Ease Chemo Brain

Exercise Boosts Cognition, Helps Ease Chemo Brain

Overall, women in the exercise program had more than double the improvement in cognition processing speed, which measures how fast information can be taken in and used, compared to women in the control group. Women in the exercise group who had been diagnosed in the past 2 years were 4 times more likely to have improved cognition speed than women in the control group. Women in the exercise group also had 3 times the improvement in self-reported cognition function than women in the control group.

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Ways to Improve Your Mood when You Have Breast Cancer 

Ways to Improve Your Mood when You Have Breast Cancer 

Having breast cancer can lead to some unhappy days and moments. You might be wondering why you had to get cancer. Feeling hopeless and scared are common emotions when hearing a breast cancer diagnosis. However, how you decide to act after receiving your diagnosis important. I believe that it is necessary to find things that will help you fight self-pity, hopelessness, and sadness. Yes, it’s completely natural to feel hopeless and scared sometimes, but falling into a sadness every day is also not good for your mood or your mental health.

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7 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting Chemo

7 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting Chemo

You don’t want to be left wounded on the battlefield. Chemo is an experience we’re mostly unprepared to handle. My first few times were terrifying and I didn’t know what I was doing or what to expect. So, I’d like to share seven things I wish I had known about chemo before I started.

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Does Your Laundry Detergent Contain These 5 Common Carcinogens?

Does Your Laundry Detergent Contain These 5 Common Carcinogens?

You may be getting more than you bargained for when you wash your clothes. That’s because many commercial laundry detergents contain toxic carcinogens. And, you may be exposing yourself to these cancer-causing chemicals every time you do the laundry or wear the clothes you’ve washed. That’s a disturbing and counter-intuitive thought.

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The Facade of Breast Cancer Awareness, Susan G. Komen and the Pink Ribbon

The Facade of Breast Cancer Awareness, Susan G. Komen and the Pink Ribbon

Educated people who have learned the truth have stopped blindly supporting Komen as it has become crystal clear about their deceptive marketing tactics and questionable use of funds. In just the last few years, revenues for Komen have sharply dropped. Many intelligent women (and men) who once proudly raised money to “race for a cure” have begun to recognize “pinkwashing” for what it is.

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9 Ways a Cancer Coach Can Help You Beat Cancer

9 Ways a Cancer Coach Can Help You Beat Cancer

More often than not, cancer coaches have been through cancer themselves and have beaten it. They know, like no one else knows, all about the shock of diagnosis and the resulting stress. They have experienced firsthand the anxiety for the future and what it may hold, and what may lie ahead. Through their personal experiences and training, they have acquired skills to help others through the minefield that cancer can be.

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Eating Our Way to Disease

Eating Our Way to Disease

Dr. T. Colin Campbell, one of the lead scientists of the China-Cornell-Oxford Study, a 20-year study “that found 8,000 statistically significant correlations between eating animal protein and risk of disease in 65 counties in China,” is emphatic about the danger of dairy products. He told The Guardian that “cows’ milk protein may be the single most significant chemical carcinogen to which humans are exposed.” Susan Levin, director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, warned in the book, “Milk, because of what it is [a fluid designed to jump-start the growth of a 60-pound calf into a 1,500-pound cow], makes things grow faster, and that includes cancer cells. This is not a product even in its purest state that you want to consume.”

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